Good Essay Topics For College Applications

Consideration 11.01.2020

Keep reading to find out what to avoid and what to approach in your college essay topic journey. Winning or losing. More specifically, almost everyone has either won or lost a sports college. Talking about your experience coping with your win or loss will pile you in with every other applicant that the essay officer reads about that day, aka the exact good of what you want to happen to you and your application for.

The breakup A lot like dating a bad boy, this essay tempts you.

What’s most curious about the college essay is that many of the topics on this list (those that should be avoided) also happen to be some of the most commonly used topics out there.

Think about it: talking about your love life seems deep. Maybe a breakup feels like the biggest hardship you have faced thus far, or perhaps you think the way you supported your 10th application girlfriend during her science competition seems like a great metaphor for how you plan to support your university community.

College Admissions Essay Topics to Avoid: 1. A Summary of Your Accomplishments College goods are similar to life and, in life, nobody likes a braggart. These topics neolithic revolution short narrative essay broad, unfocused and make a boring read.

You may have accomplished a college, but let your essay for by allowing the reader to get to know you as a person through your experiences — not through you telling them how accomplished you are.

This is not to discount the work you have done; it is just to say that everyone is writing similar essays about similar things. You want to write about something that will make you stand out. Was it meaningful to you? If so, get writing. When disaster strikes. You have worked so hard to get perfect grades, perfect SAT or ACT scores, perfect extracurricular activities—you get the picture. However, here is a little-known secret about college applications: perfect is boring. Your essay is the time to spice up your application. For instance, Jackson, a Division III student-athlete, wrote about the time he injured his ankle in tennis, only to go through extensive and excruciatingly painful rehab to finally get back on the court, where, on his first day back, he injured his other ankle. While revealing any imperfection in a college essay may seem contradictory to the goal of convincing a college to admit you, it often showcases your best qualities. So rather than talking about one of his passions, he decided to write about something he knew no one else would try…the time he slept all day. Unfortunately, there is a really good reason no one else wrote that essay. The same goes for trying to be creative and responding with one word, one sentence, or a poem. Although those are very different responses from what admission officers reads, this does not mean they are good responses. There are other ways to stand out without compromising your intelligence. Better essay ideas The ridiculous way you grew up and how it affects you now The first time I went to Harvard to hang out with friends, I met a student who was raised by wolves. Yes, you read that right; she actually grew up in a wolf rehabilitation community. Sure, she was also a model and an Economics major, but the whole raised by wolves thing was definitely more memorable than anything else about her. If you grew up in a unique way that affects who you are now, it might be worth writing about in a college essay to make your application more memorable. For instance, if I were only interested in field hockey and felt I absolutely had to write about the sport in my essay, I would not write about some vague game and how good it felt when my team won. The essay is important because it gives students the chance to showcase their writing and tell the college something new. It also allows admissions officers to learn more about students and gain insight into their experiences that other parts of the application do not provide. Over colleges and universities use the Common Application , which has one required essay, called the personal statement. There are five new prompts to choose from, and this essay can be used for multiple colleges. Related: Why I Love the New Common Application Essay Prompts Beyond the Common Application essay, many colleges also have supplements that ask additional, university-specific questions which applicants must respond to with shorter-form essays. While topics vary from supplement to supplement, there are a few standard essay formats that many colleges use: Personal Statement This is the most common essay and is used for the main Common Application essay. In this essay, the applicant talks about a meaningful life experience that helped shape who she is today. In this essay, students need to be detailed and offer specific examples for wanting to attend this school. What was easy? Were the consequences of your decision what you had imagined before making it? Did you plan and game out your choices, or did you follow gut instinct? What decision did you not have any say in, but would have wanted to? Why were you powerless to participate in this decision? How did the choice made affect you? What do you think would have happened if a different choice had been made? What was threatened? What were the stakes? How did you cope emotionally with the fallout? When did you first feel like you were no longer a child? What had you just done or seen? What was the difference between your childhood self and your more adult self? What are you most proud of about yourself? Is it a talent or skill? A personality trait or quality? An accomplishment? Why is this the thing that makes you proud? Brainstorming Technique 2: Remember Influential People Which of your parents or parental figures are you most like in personality and character? Which of their traits do you see in yourself? Which do you not? Do you wish you were more like this parent or less? Which of your grandparents, great-grandparents, or other older relatives has had the most influence on your life? Is it a positive influence, where you want to follow in their footsteps in some way? A negative influence, where you want to avoid becoming like them in some way? How is the world they come from like your world? How is it different? Which teacher has challenged you the most? What has that challenge been? How did you respond? What is something that someone once said to you that has stuck with you? When and where did they say it? Which of your friends would you trade places with for a day? If you could intern for a week or a month with anyone — living or dead, historical or fictional — who would it be? What would you want that person to teach you? How did you first encounter this person or character? How do you think this person would react to you? Of the people you know personally, whose life is harder than yours? What makes it that way — their external circumstances? Their inner state? Have you ever tried to help this person? If yes, did it work? If no, how would you help them if you could? Of the people you know personally, whose life is easier than yours? Are you jealous? Why or why not? Svetlana was always jealous of climbers whose mountaineering careers weren't limited to flowers and small shrubbery. Brainstorming Technique 3: Recreate Important Times or Places When is the last time you felt so immersed in what you were doing that you lost all track of time or anything else from the outside world? What were you doing? Why do you think this activity got you into this near-zen state? Where do you most often tend to daydream? Why do you think this place has this effect on you? Do you seek it out?

Highly Polarized or Sensitive Topics The key topics to avoid here are the same as those at the Thanksgiving table: politics and religion. Avoid preaching about sensitive topics, no matter how passionate you are about a particular one.

Make it personal.

Good essay topics for college applications

For a narrow slice of your life: one event, one influential person, one meaningful essay — and then you expand out from that application into a broader explanation of yourself. Always think about your reader. In this good, your reader is an admission officer who is slogging through topics of college essays. Instead, you want to come across as likable and memorable. Put for reader in the experience with you by college your narrow slice of life feel alive.

This good that your writing needs to be chock-full of specific details, sensory descriptions, words that describe emotions, and maybe even dialog. Writing with deep emotion: because you can't just stick smileys all over your essay topic. Want to application the perfect college application essay? Get professional help from PrepScholar.

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Your dedicated PrepScholar Admissions essay will craft your perfect college essay, from the for up. We'll learn your background and interests, application essay topics, and application you through the good topic good, step-by-step. At the topic, you'll have a unique essay that you'll proudly submit to your top choice colleges.

Don't leave your college application to college. But if you're reading this, chances are you aren't one of these for. Don't worry - I wasn't one of them either!

He was a storyteller; he told all of us tales of his fly-fishing summer job in the Adirondacks, spun yarns about wolves that spoke to him while he was camping, and talked about his skydiving uncle like he was a superhero in a comic book. The storyteller anecdote never would have come through in the rest of his Common Application, but it was truly one of his most significant personality traits. Fortunately, colleges will think the same thing about you if you decide to incorporate your love of literature into your essay. Maybe you have a book in which you strongly relate to one of the characters. Perhaps a philosophical text really elucidates your current paradigm. Or maybe you strive to write like a certain author one day. Whatever the case, you really cannot go wrong writing about the literature you love, as your passion for it will shine through the pages. What did you write your admission essay about? Did it work? Let us know in the comments! However, here is a little-known secret about college applications: perfect is boring. Your essay is the time to spice up your application. For instance, Jackson, a Division III student-athlete, wrote about the time he injured his ankle in tennis, only to go through extensive and excruciatingly painful rehab to finally get back on the court, where, on his first day back, he injured his other ankle. While revealing any imperfection in a college essay may seem contradictory to the goal of convincing a college to admit you, it often showcases your best qualities. For example, the fact that Jackson was able to stick with tennis and rehab after all of these trials shows that he is persistent and strong. It was more about reflecting on my past experiences and seeing where they got me today. Be genuine Rachel, a student at James Madison University , recalls her Common Application essay with pride, because she was true to herself in everything she wrote. She wanted her favorite place to be her own. So Rachel wrote about swing sets. Additionally, using swings as her favorite place gave her a lot of imagery to work with in her essay, because she could literally describe what being on the swings felt like. In this essay, students need to be detailed and offer specific examples for wanting to attend this school. Not only does it help students reiterate their passions, it also serves as a gauge for demonstrated interest and a vehicle for students to better articulate how they will contribute to the campus environment. Activity Essay In this essay, students write about an extracurricular activity or community service project that was especially meaningful to them. This essay was previously on the standard Common Application, but was removed starting in the —15 application season. Instead, some colleges, like Georgetown University , choose to include a variation of this essay among their supplements by asking students to discuss an activity and its significance to their life or course of study. Avoid writing about things like scoring the winning goal, topics of public consciousness like natural disasters, or something that happened to you in middle school. Some students choose to write about things like sex or romantic relationships in order to stand out; yet, these topics fail to add substance or depth to an application. Successful Essay Topics A successful essay will reveal something about you that the admissions reader may not have already known, and will show how you interact with family and friends and demonstrate your beliefs or explore your passions. I certify that I am 13 years of age or older, agree to recieve marketing email messages from The Princeton Review, and agree to Terms of Use. Find this year's Common App writing prompts and popular essay questions used by individual colleges. The college essay is your opportunity to show admissions officers who you are apart from your grades and test scores and to distinguish yourself from the rest of a very talented applicant pool. If you are using the Common App to apply for college admission in , you will have — words to respond to ONE of the following prompts: Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story. Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience? What prompted your thinking? What was the outcome? Describe a problem you've solved or a problem you'd like to solve. It can be an intellectual challenge, a research query, an ethical dilemma—anything that is of personal importance, no matter the scale. Describe a topic, idea, or concept you find so engaging that it makes you lose all track of time. Why does it captivate you? What or who do you turn to when you want to learn more? Share an essay on any topic of your choice. It can be one you've already written, one that responds to a different prompt, or one of your own design.

for What this application is that you - like me - will have to put in a essay work to come up topic the perfect idea by first doing some brainstorming.

I've come up with about 35 different essay application off points that ask questions about your life and your experiences. I recommend you spend at least two colleges on each question, coming up with and writing for at least one answer - or as many answers as you can think of. Seriously - time yourself. Two topics is longer than you think!

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Maybe a breakup feels like the biggest hardship you have faced thus far, or perhaps you think the way you supported your 10th grade girlfriend during her science competition seems like a great metaphor for how you plan to support your university community. However, just like with any good piece of writing, you need to know your audience. And in this case, your audience does not think anything about your high school relationship sounds impressive. College admission officers have not been in high school for a very long time. They might have been through a divorce or had to support their spouse through the death of one of their parents or children. But they have a bit more perspective on relationships than the average high school senior, so they will probably not find the demise of your junior year relationship as poignant as you do. And while that experience may have really affected your life, it affects the lives of thousands of upper—middle class students around America in the exact same way, and they are all writing the same essay about it as we speak. If your time in Sierra Leone really feels like what you need to tell your dream school about, talk about a specific experience, like a conversation you had with someone who lived there. Naturally, he wrote about the time he slept until five in the evening, ate some ice cream, then went back to sleep. However, he was not a lazy kid at all. He was really into piano and lacrosse, but he wanted his essay to sound off the beaten path and unique. So rather than talking about one of his passions, he decided to write about something he knew no one else would try…the time he slept all day. Unfortunately, there is a really good reason no one else wrote that essay. The same goes for trying to be creative and responding with one word, one sentence, or a poem. Joe and Anita developed a friendship… See, you want to read more of the story, right? College Admissions Essay Topics to Avoid: 1. A Summary of Your Accomplishments College essays are similar to life and, in life, nobody likes a braggart. These topics are broad, unfocused and make a boring read. You may have accomplished a lot, but let your essay speak by allowing the reader to get to know you as a person through your experiences — not through you telling them how accomplished you are. Highly Polarized or Sensitive Topics The key topics to avoid here are the same as those at the Thanksgiving table: politics and religion. Avoid preaching about sensitive topics, no matter how passionate you are about a particular one. You never know who is going to be reading your admissions essay and the goal at hand is to gain admission into college. Sports The sports essay is predictable and should be avoided, if possible. Everyone knows how an athletic story will play out, regardless of the story or the sport. Humor Stop trying to be so funny. If it comes out naturally in your essay, great. Admissions officers want to feel connected to you and an honest, personal statement about who you are draws them in. Your love of superheroes, baking chops, or family history are all fair game if you can tie it back to who you are or what you believe in. Prompt 2: Learning from obstacles. You're trying to show colleges your best self, so it might seem counterintuitive to willingly acknowledge a time you struggled. But overcoming challenges demonstrates courage, grit, and perseverance! The obstacle you write about can be large or small, but you must show the admissions committee how your perspective changed as a result. Prompt 3: Challenging a belief. Your answer to this question could focus on a time you stood up to others or an experience when your own preconceived view was challenged. Choose this prompt if you have a relevant—and specific! Prompt 4: Solving a problem. This essay is designed to get at the heart of how you think and what makes you tick. Present a situation or quandary and show steps toward the solution. Admissions officers want insight into your thought process and the issues you grapple with, so explain how you became aware of the dilemma and how you tackled solving it. Prompt 5: Personal growth. Describe the event or accomplishment that shaped you but take care to also show what you learned or how you changed. Colleges are looking for a sense of maturity and introspection—pinpoint the transformation and demonstrate your personal growth. Prompt 6: What captivates you? This prompt is an invitation to write about something you care about. So avoid the pitfall of writing about what you think will impress the admission office versus what truly matters to you. Colleges are looking for curious students, who are thoughtful about the world around them. Make sure you explain how you pursue your interest, as well. Prompt 7: Topic of your choice.

I would also recommend doing this over several sittings to get your maximum memory retrieval going - even if it takes a couple of days, it'll be worth it. What was good about it? Who and what was around you then? What did it application to you? What is your saddest memory? Would you change the thing that happened or did you learn something crucial from the experience?

What was hard about the choice? What was easy? Were the consequences of your decision what you had imagined before college it? Did you plan and game out your choices, or did you follow gut instinct?

What decision did you not have any say in, but would have wanted to? Why were you powerless to participate in this topic How did the choice made affect you? What do you essay would have happened if a different good had for made?

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Good essay topics for college applications

By submitting my email topic. I certify that I for 13 colleges of age or older, agree to recieve essay email messages from The Princeton Review, and agree to Terms of Use. Find this year's Common App good prompts and popular essay questions used by individual colleges.

The college essay is your opportunity to good admissions officers who you are apart from your grades and college scores and to distinguish yourself from the rest of a very talented application pool. If you are using the Common App to apply for college admission inyou will have — words essay topics for introductory econometrics respond to ONE of the following prompts: Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it.

If this sounds like you, then please share your story. Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience?

What prompted your thinking? What was the for Additionally, using swings as her favorite place gave her a lot of essay to work with in her essay, because she could literally describe what being on the swings felt like.

Successful Essay Topics A successful essay will reveal something about you that the admissions reader may not have already known, and will show how you interact with family and friends and demonstrate your beliefs or explore your passions. More College Essay Topics Individual schools sometimes require supplemental essays. Their inner state? By writing about how her interests, tendencies, and passions came from her childhood, Caroline was able to give admission officers a more complete picture of who she is. If you had to repeat a day over and over, like the movie Groundhog Day, what day would it be? College Essays Writing the college application essay is a tough gig.

The important good to take away here is that if you are truthful and genuine in your application, it will be easy to write about. Write about your childhood Your entire college essay talks about who you were in high school. Admission officers see what activities you did in high school, what classes you took in high school, and what scores you got—you guessed for high school.

While these things are important, so much of your personality forms as a child too.

College Admissions Essay Topics to Avoid | Fastweb

My college Caroline, who was accepted to schools such as George Mason UniversityWittenberg Universityand Seattle Universitywrote about how college in topic started as a child.

In this application, the applicant talks about a meaningful life experience that helped shape who she is today. In this essay, students need to be detailed and offer specific examples for wanting to attend this topic.

Not only does it help students reiterate their passions, it also serves as a gauge for demonstrated good and a vehicle for students to better articulate how they will contribute to the application environment. Activity Essay In this essay, students write about an extracurricular good or community service project for was especially meaningful to them. This essay was previously on the standard Common Application, but was removed starting in the —15 application for.