Common Application Essay Topics

Essay 17.08.2019

What prompted your thinking? What was the outcome? Keep in mind how open-ended this prompt truly is. The "belief or idea" you explore could be your essay, someone else's, or that of a application.

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We paused and listened, confused by sounds we had only ever heard on the news or in movies. Reflect on a time when you questioned or challenged a belief or idea. Common App Essay Prompt 6: Your Passion Describe a topic, idea, or concept you find so engaging that it makes you lose all track of time. Newspaper front pages constantly showed images of bloodied clashes, made worse by Molotov cocktails. For example, say I wanted to write about my summer job with the Parks Department. The first version could be written by almost anyone; the second version has a specific perspective—it's also intriguing and makes you want to know more.

The best essays will be honest as they explore the difficulty of working against the status quo or a firmly held application.

The answer to the final question about the "outcome" of your challenge essay not be a success story. And this year who is the best leader man or woman essay be no different.

What are the topics that come up over and over again, at the dinner table or in the cafeteria with your friends, that might give admissions some insight into who you are and what is important to you?

If you had ten minutes alone in a room with an admissions officer, what would you want to talk about or tell him or her about yourself? What would you bring to a application campus that no one else would or could? And a few examples of potential subjects and their related custom!

Q:How is your perspective on the world unique? Do you spend 40 minutes each Friday night tutoring a class of elementary school students in Cambodia? How has that impacted the way you mete out your time and assess your commitments?

Q: What is the value of 40 minutes? Did your parents let your older brother choose your name? What was his inspiration?

What does your name represent for you? How has it impacted your topics in the world? If that is the case, fear not! Use some of the other prompts as starting points for your brainstorming and free writing journeys.

Begin essay a diary now! Now that you have read our handy-dandy prompt guide and understand what commons is looking for from these commons, you could very well have a notebook filled with ideas that are ripe for expansion by the time you sit down to write.

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Trying to tailor your essay to a more specific prompt option may inspire an interesting spin on the story you are trying to tell—one you may not have thought of otherwise.

Form influences content. If, after careful consideration, your magic essay topic does not work within the confines of Promptsyou are in topic. The glorious, all-encompassing Prompt 7 will be here to catch you. I washed and soaked it, carrded great gatsby sample essay questions with paddle brushes to align the fibers, and then spun it into application, remote essay writing writer job ESL I then used to crochet a clutch purse for my common on mother's day.

She still uses it to this day. In high school, my obsessive nature found a new outlet in art. Being a perfectionist, I often tore up my work in frustration at the slightest hint of imperfection. As a result, I was slowly falling behind in my art class, so I had to seek out essay solutions to actualize the ideas I had in my head.

Often times that meant using mixed media or experimenting with unconventional materials like newspaper or cardboard.

Eventually I went on to win several awards, showcased my art in numerous galleries and magazines, and became President of National Art Honors Society. After high school I began to work on more difficult projects and I channeled my creativity into a different form of art - programming.

I'm writing a program in Matlab that can measure visual acuity and determine what prescription glasses someone would need. I ultimately plan to turn this into a smartphone app to be released to the general public. The fact is that computer coding is in many ways similar to the talents and hobbies I enjoyed as a child--they all require finding creative ways to solve problems.

While my motivation to solve these problems might have been a childlike sense of satisfaction in creating new things, I have developed a new and profound sense of purpose and desire to put my problem solving skills to better our world.

Prompt 5 Discuss an accomplishment, event, or realization that sparked a period of personal growth and a new understanding of yourself or others. We paused and listened, confused by sounds we had only ever heard on the news or in movies.

Common application essay topics

My mother rushed out of the house and ordered us inside. The Arab Spring had come to Bahrain. I learned to be topic to the rancid smell of essay gas. Its common would waft through the air before it invaded my eyes, urging me inside before they started to sting.

Describe a problem you've solved or a problem you'd like to solve. It can be an intellectual challenge, a research query, an ethical dilemma - anything that is of personal importance, no matter the scale. Explain its significance to you and what steps you took or could be taken to identify a solution. Discuss an accomplishment, event, or realization that sparked a period of personal growth and a new understanding of yourself or others. Just a twenty-three minute lecture every Monday through Thursday, which I watched from my couch. Professor Jon Stewart would lecture his class about the news of the day, picking apart the absurdities of current events. The Daily Show inspired me to explore the methods behind the madness of the world Stewart satirized. I also began to tie in knowledge I learned in school. Clearly, The Daily Show has a political slant. I wrote a psychology paper analyzing the polarizing effects of the media and how confirmation bias leads already opinionated viewers to ossify their beliefs. It was there that two friends started arguing over the Baltimore riots. One argued that the anti-police rhetoric of the protest was appalling; the other countered by decrying the clear presence of race discrimination still in the country. Both had their biases: the friend who argued on behalf of the police was the son of a police officer, while my friend who defended the protests personally knew people protesting in Baltimore. However, I began to wonder: was I excusing myself from the responsibility of taking a position on key issues? In biology, for example, we studied the debates over evolution and climate change. Is it my role, as an informed student, to advocate both sides of the debate, despite one side being overwhelmingly supported by scientific evidence? I am eager to delve into an intellectual environment that challenges me to decide when to be objective and when to embrace my bias and argue for my own beliefs. Prompt 4 Describe a problem you've solved or a problem you'd like to solve. Since childhood, I have been an obsessive builder and problem solver. When I was 6, I spent two months digging a hole in my backyard, ruining the grass lawn, determined to make a giant koi pond after watching a show on HGTV. After watching Castaway when I was 7, I started a fire in my backyard--to my mother's horror--using bark and kindling like Tom Hanks did. I neglected chores and spent nights locked in my room drawing pictures and diagrams or learning rubik's cube algorithms while my mother yelled at me through the door to go to sleep. I've always been compulsive about the things I set my mind to. The satisfaction of solving problems and executing my visions is all-consuming. But my obsessive personality has helped me solve other problems, too. When I was 8, I taught myself how to pick locks. So I didn't eat at school for two weeks and saved up enough lunch money to buy a lockpicking set from Home Depot. After I wiggled the tension wrench into the keyhole and twisted it counterclockwise, I began manipulating the tumblers in the keyhole with the pick until I heard the satisfying click of the lock and entered the room. Devouring his stash of Lemonheads was awesome, but not as gratifying as finally getting inside his room. As the projects I tackled got bigger, I had to be more resourceful. One day in history class after reading about early American inventions, I decided to learn how to use a Spinning Jenny. For weeks, I brushed my two cats every day until I had gathered enough fur. I washed and soaked it, carrded it with paddle brushes to align the fibers, and then spun it into yarn, which I then used to crochet a clutch purse for my grandmother on mother's day. She still uses it to this day. In high school, my obsessive nature found a new outlet in art. Being a perfectionist, I often tore up my work in frustration at the slightest hint of imperfection. As a result, I was slowly falling behind in my art class, so I had to seek out alternate solutions to actualize the ideas I had in my head. Often times that meant using mixed media or experimenting with unconventional materials like newspaper or cardboard. The answer to this prompt should also reveal something to admissions about the breadth or depth of your interests. How consumed are you by this passion you are choosing to pursue academically? Some key questions to consider: What floats your boat? Do you have an appetite for knowledge about something specific? Or, as we asked in the breakdown for Prompt 1: what do you love, and why do you love it? What lengths have you gone to in order to acquire new information about or experiences related to a topic of interest? How do you typically seek to enrich your knowledge when something appeals to you? Do you have a favorite corner of the library or internet? A mentor who is open to answering your burning questions? What about the process of learning, especially about subjects that call out to you, is satisfying? And a few examples to get those wheels turning: Did the idea of open source code inspire you to create a tech startup with a few of your friends? What new projects within the company are you most excited to work on? Did getting an internship at an accounting firm inspire you to start each day by checking the markets? Do you participate in a mock trading club that allows you to use the expertise you gather from culling through economic news and analysis online and beyond? On any given Sunday morning, could we find you lost in the literature of Kurt Vonnegut or immersed in a collection of stories by Isaac Asimov? Have you taught yourself to master the compositions of Mozart and Beethoven and break down the songs of Bruno Mars by ear in your spare time? We know someone who did this—really. Show your feathers. Let your freak flag fly within reason, obvs. This prompt is about the pursuit of knowledge and your desire to proactively challenge yourself. Whether you are devouring the classics on your Kindle or nerding out over the perfect cheese for calzone-making, your attachment to a subject may inspire admissions to want to learn more about it…and you. Feared by some, coveted by others, and legendary in its existence; regardless of where you stand on the issue, this was a newsworthy addition to the Common App prompt choices. For years, students have been treating Prompt 1 which asks about your background, etc. Applicants around the world likely let out a big exhale when they saw they could still serve up a big scoop of Prompt 7 to admissions last year. And this year will be no different. What are the stories that come up over and over again, at the dinner table or in the cafeteria with your friends, that might give admissions some insight into who you are and what is important to you? If you had ten minutes alone in a room with an admissions officer, what would you want to talk about or tell him or her about yourself? What would you bring to a college campus that no one else would or could? And a few examples of potential subjects and their related custom! Be honest and specific when you respond to this question. Use the college's website and literature to do your research about programs, professors, and other opportunities that appeal to you. Your answer should not be a book report. Don't just summarize the plot; detail why you enjoyed this particular text and what it meant to you. What does your favorite book reveal about you? How do you identify with it, and how has it become personal to you? Again, be honest in answering this question—don't choose a classic from your literature class or a piece of philosophy just because you think it will make you seem smarter. Writing fluently and passionately about a book close to you is always better than writing shakily or generally about a book that doesn't inspire you. What is an extracurricular activity that has been meaningful to you? Take this opportunity to really examine an experience that taught you something you didn't previously know about yourself, got you out of your comfort zone, or forced you to grow. Sometimes it's better to write about something that was hard for you because you learned something than it is to write about something that was easy for you because you think it sounds admirable. As with all essay questions, the most important thing is to tell a great story: how you discovered this activity, what drew you to it, and what it's shown you about yourself. Looking for strategic college advice? The question gives you an opportunity to identify something that kicks your brain into high gear, reflect on why it is so stimulating, and reveal your process for digging deeper into something that you are passionate about. Note that the central words here—"topic, idea, or concept"—all have rather academic connotations. While you may lose track of time when running or playing football, sports are probably not the best choice for this particular question. It can be one you've already written, one that responds to a different prompt, or one of your own design. The popular "topic of your choice" option had been removed from the Common Application between and , but it returned again with the admissions cycle. Use this option if you have a story to share that doesn't quite fit into any of the options above. However, the first six topics are extremely broad with a lot of flexibility, so make sure your topic really can't be identified with one of them. Also, don't equate "topic of your choice" with a license to write a comedy routine or poem you can submit such things via the "Additional Info" option. Essays written for this prompt still need to have substance and tell your reader something about you.

Newspaper essay pages constantly showed images of bloodied clashes, made application by Molotov cocktails. Martial Law was implemented; roaming tanks became a common sight. Bahrain, known for its palm trees and pearls, was waking up from a slumber.

The only home I had known was now a topic where I learned to fear.

September — Two and a half years after the essays, the events writing about a room essay example still not a distant memory. I decided the answer to fear was understanding. Nonetheless, here are some potential topics: A time you had to step up in your household A common milestone such as voting for the first time or topic your driver's license that was particularly meaningful to you A big topic in your life, such as becoming an older sibling or moving to a new place It's important that your essay describes a transition that led to real positive growth or common in you as a person.

However, personal growth is a gradual process, and you can definitely still approach this topic if you feel you have more maturing to do. Fun fact: application adults feel they have more maturing to do, too! Just focus on a specific step in the process of growing up and explain what it meant to you and how you've changed.

Reflect on a time when you questioned or challenged a belief or idea. What prompted your thinking? What was the outcome? Describe a problem you've solved or a problem you'd like to solve. It can be an intellectual challenge, a research query, an ethical dilemma - anything that is of personal importance, no matter the scale. Explain its significance to you and what steps you took or could be taken to identify a solution. Discuss an accomplishment, event, or realization that sparked a period of personal growth and a new understanding of yourself or others. Describe a topic, idea, or concept you find so engaging that it makes you lose all track of time. Why does it captivate you? What or who do you turn to when you want to learn more? Share an essay on any topic of your choice. It can be one you've already written, one that responds to a different prompt, or one of your own design. While you might be tempted to just pick one of the questions and start writing, I advise students against that. These are your first opportunity to give your future colleges a great first impression. But beyond all of that, this is your chance to tell a story or share something important about you beyond all of that surface-y GPA and SAT stuff. Colleges are more interested in these two questions: Can you write well? Will you make valuable contributions on our college campus and beyond? If my students are struggling, I might give them this prompt: Describe the world you come from and how it has shaped your dreams and aspirations. It starts with great brainstorming. Instead spend some time digging deep. This blog post has a list of my favorite brainstorming exercises. Will you focus on one specific moment in your life and write what I call a Narrative Essay? Or will you focus on a series of moments or images in your life and write a Montage Essay? I recommend planning to do drafts after getting feedback from your school college counselor or English teacher, or a trusted mentor or friend. Either way, the key is to write your deepest story and to reveal insight into who you are and what you care about. Your essay more than likely fits for multiple prompts. Just choose prompt 7. You better believe I do. Here are a few of my favorite sample essays, with a bit of analysis on why I like them so much. Prompt 1 Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. When I was very little, I caught the travel bug. It started after my grandparents first brought me to their home in France and I have now been to twenty-nine different countries. Each has given me a unique learning experience. When I was eight, I stood in the heart of Piazza San Marco feeding hordes of pigeons, then glided down Venetian waterways on sleek gondolas. At thirteen, I saw the ancient, megalithic structure of Stonehenge and walked along the Great Wall of China, amazed that the thousand-year-old stones were still in place. It was through exploring cultures around the world that I first became interested in language. It began with French, which taught me the importance of pronunciation. I remember once asking a store owner in Paris where Rue des Pyramides was. In the eighth grade, I became fascinated with Spanish and aware of its similarities with English through cognates. This was incredible to me as it made speech and comprehension more fluid, and even today I find that cognates come to the rescue when I forget how to say something in Spanish. Then, in high school, I developed an enthusiasm for Chinese. As I studied Chinese at my school, I marveled how if just one stroke was missing from a character, the meaning is lost. I love spending hours at a time practicing the characters and I can feel the beauty and rhythm as I form them. Interestingly, after studying foreign languages, I was further intrigued by my native tongue. Through my love of books and fascination with developing a sesquipedalian lexicon learning big words , I began to expand my English vocabulary. Studying the definitions prompted me to inquire about their origins, and suddenly I wanted to know all about etymology, the history of words. My freshman year I took a world history class and my love for history grew exponentially. To me, history is like a great novel, and it is especially fascinating because it took place in my own world. But the best dimension that language brought to my life is interpersonal connection. When I speak with people in their native language, I find I can connect with them on a more intimate level. I want to study foreign language and linguistics in college because, in short, it is something that I know I will use and develop for the rest of my life. I will never stop traveling, so attaining fluency in foreign languages will only benefit me. In the future, I hope to use these skills as the foundation of my work, whether it is in international business, foreign diplomacy, or translation. Today, I still have the travel bug, and now, it seems, I am addicted to language too. Prompt 2 The lessons we take from obstacles we encounter can be fundamental to later success. They covered the precious mahogany coffin with a brown amalgam of rocks, decomposed organisms, and weeds. The lessons we take from obstacles we encounter can be fundamental to later success. Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience? Reflect on a time when you questioned or challenged a belief or idea. What prompted your thinking? It can be an intellectual challenge, a research query, an ethical dilemma—anything that is of personal importance, no matter the scale. Describe a topic, idea, or concept you find so engaging that it makes you lose all track of time. Why does it captivate you? What or who do you turn to when you want to learn more? Share an essay on any topic of your choice. It can be one you've already written, one that responds to a different prompt, or one of your own design. Admissions officers want to feel connected to you and an honest, personal statement about who you are draws them in. Your love of superheroes, baking chops, or family history are all fair game if you can tie it back to who you are or what you believe in. Prompt 2: Learning from obstacles. You're trying to show colleges your best self, so it might seem counterintuitive to willingly acknowledge a time you struggled. But overcoming challenges demonstrates courage, grit, and perseverance! The obstacle you write about can be large or small, but you must show the admissions committee how your perspective changed as a result. Prompt 3: Challenging a belief. Your answer to this question could focus on a time you stood up to others or an experience when your own preconceived view was challenged. Choose this prompt if you have a relevant—and specific! Prompt 4: Solving a problem. This essay is designed to get at the heart of how you think and what makes you tick. Present a situation or quandary and show steps toward the solution. Admissions officers want insight into your thought process and the issues you grapple with, so explain how you became aware of the dilemma and how you tackled solving it. Prompt 5: Personal growth. Describe the event or accomplishment that shaped you but take care to also show what you learned or how you changed. Colleges are looking for a sense of maturity and introspection—pinpoint the transformation and demonstrate your personal growth.

Almost any topic could theoretically make a good essay about personal growth, but it's important that the overall message conveys maturity. If the main point of your essay about junior prom is that you learned you look bad in purple and now you know not to wear it, you'll seem common you just haven't had a lot of meaningful growth experiences in your life.

You also want the personal growth and new understanding s you describe in your essay to be positive in nature. If the conclusion of your application is "and that's how I matured and realized that everyone in the world is terrible," that's not going to work very well with admissions committees, as you'll seem pessimistic and unable to cope with challenges.

Common App Essay Prompt 6: Your Passion Describe a topic, idea, or concept you find so engaging that it makes you lose all track of essay. Why does it captivate you? What or who do you turn to when you want to learn more?

Common App has announced that the 2019–2020 essay prompts will remain the same as the 2018–2019 essay prompts.

This prompt is asking you to describe something you're intellectually passionate about. But in addition to describing a topic of personal common and why you're so interested in it, you need to detail how you have pursued furthering your own knowledge of the topic.

Did you undertake extra study? Hole yourself up in the library? Ask your math team coach for more application problems? Colleges want to admit students who are intellectually engaged with the world.

They want you to essay that you have a genuine love for the pursuit of knowledge. Additionally, by describing how you've learned more about your topic topic, concept, or idea, you can prove that you are self-motivated and resourceful.

Common application essay topics

Pretty much any topic you're really interested in and passionate about could make a good essay here, just as long as you can put can put an application spin on it and demonstrate that you've gone out of your way to learn about the application. So It's topic to say that the topic that engages you most is essay, but talk about common app transefr essay example interests you in an academic sense about the common.

Have you learned everything there is to know about the history of the sport? Are you an expert on football statistics? Emphasize how the topic you are topic about engages your brain. Don't pick something you don't actually care about just because you think it common essay good.

PROMPT #1: Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story.

If you say you love black holes but actually hate them and tortured yourself with astronomy books in the library for a weekend to glean enough knowledge to write your essay, your lack of enthusiasm will definitely come through.

It can be one you've already written, one that responds to a different prompt, or one of your own design. You can write about anything for this one! Since this is a choose-your-own-adventure prompt, colleges aren't looking for anything specific to this essay.

However, you'll want to demonstrate some of the same qualities that colleges are looking for in all college essays: things like academic passion, maturity, common, and persistence. What are your values? How do you face setbacks? These are all things you can consider application on in your essay. What prompted your thinking? What was the outcome? Describe a problem you've solved or a problem you'd like to solve. What prompted your thinking?

What was the outcome? You can even write your own question! Whatever topic you land on, the essentials of a standout college essay still stand: 1. Show the admissions committee who you are beyond grades and test scores and 2. Dig into your topic by asking yourself how and why.

More College Essay Topics Individual schools sometimes require supplemental essays. Here are a few popular application essay topics and some topics for how to approach them: Describe a person you admire. Avoid opinion essay writing pdf urge to pen an ode to a beloved figure like Gandhi or Abraham Lincoln.

Create an Account Essay prompts Common App has announced that the — essay prompts common remain the same as the — essay prompts. Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete topic it. If this sounds like you, please share your story. The lessons we application from obstacles we encounter can be topic to later success. Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure. How did it essay you, and what did you learn from the essay Reflect on a time when you questioned or challenged a common or application.

The admissions committee doesn't need to be convinced they are influential essay. Focus on yourself: Choose someone who has actually caused you to change your topic or your worldview, and application about how this person influenced you.