How To Check College Essay Prompts

Interpret 03.09.2019

Also, you might want to reflect on your prompts and write how thoughts about them. Apart from knowing how to structure your college admission essay, it might be useful to take into essay some of the common app questions check the admissions officer ask most frequently. College application essay prompts can help you understand what to expect from the college and get prepared for answering their questions.

PROMPT #1: Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story.

The list of common app prompts includes the how Write about what you essay to do Recount a prompt when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure. Reflect on a check check you questioned or challenged a belief or idea. Share an essay on any topic of your college. How to choose the best college admission essay topic?

Think of some meaningful or extraordinary events that turned your life upside down and keep essay them. Stay honest, and if you have a misfortunate story to tell, share it too. Preparing your college applications and meeting various deadlines is an ordeal.

If you are using how Common App to apply for college admission inyou will have — words to respond to ONE of the prompt prompts: Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete college it. If this sounds is college worth the cost essay worksheet you, then please share your story.

You want to take the opportunity to give admissions officers as fleshed out a sense of who you are as you can, so pick topics that show different sides of your personality. College application essay prompts can help you understand what to expect from the committee and get prepared for answering their questions. But merely gathering these facts is not enough to enter the college. Mary Tipton Woolley, Associate Director of Admissions for the Georgia Institute of Technology, says that the admissions staff reviews the essay questions each year to "evaluate how well they helped us get to know the students in the admission process" [source: Woolley ]. It is also a summons to move forward with firm resolve to use wisely the blessings of freedom, in order to build a future of hope for coming generations. Have you learned to love the football team playback sessions that force you to routinely examine your mistakes, welcome constructive criticism and point yourself toward self-improvement? How consumed are you by this passion you are choosing to pursue academically? Every day at I would frantically put my hair into a bun on the car ride to ballet class.

Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience?

You're trying to show colleges your best self, so it might seem counterintuitive to willingly acknowledge a time you struggled. But overcoming challenges demonstrates courage, grit, and perseverance! The obstacle you write about can be large or small, but you must show the admissions committee how your perspective changed as a result. Prompt 3: Challenging a belief. Your answer to this question could focus on a time you stood up to others or an experience when your own preconceived view was challenged. Choose this prompt if you have a relevant—and specific! Prompt 4: Solving a problem. This essay is designed to get at the heart of how you think and what makes you tick. Present a situation or quandary and show steps toward the solution. Admissions officers want insight into your thought process and the issues you grapple with, so explain how you became aware of the dilemma and how you tackled solving it. Prompt 5: Personal growth. When approaching this type of question, you need to show that you're thoughtful about new ideas and perspectives. Colleges are full of students from all kinds of backgrounds, and admissions officers want to know that you'll be accepting of the diversity of other students, even if you don't necessarily agree with them. Also, make sure to pick a specific instance to focus on. Writing a general essay about how you accept others won't impress admissions officers—you need to show them an example of a time that you did so. I've reprinted another example from the Common App: Discuss an accomplishment, event, or realization that sparked a period of personal growth and a new understanding of yourself or others. For these types of prompts, you want to show personal growth. Explain to the reader not just who you are but also how you've changed. Really, this is a good idea no matter which prompt you're addressing! College can be challenging, so admissions officers want to know that you have the maturity to deal with likely living on your own, managing your own life, and planning for your future. Regardless of the exact prompt, the key to this type of college essay is to show what you've learned from the experience. Admissions officers don't care that much about what happened to you—they care about what you think and feel about that event. That's what will give them a sense of who you are and what kind of college student you'll make. How have you changed between graduating from kindergarten and graduating from high school? These college essay questions ask you to explain what you would bring to the college's community and how you'd fit in with its values. In addition, please include why you are interested in studying the major s you have selected. If you selected undecided please describe your areas of possible academic interest. To address this type of prompt, you'll want to give specific examples of how you embody the traits they're looking for or what benefits you'd provide to the school's community. Some prompts will ask you to address more specific ideas about the school than others, but it's always a good idea to touch on the individual school's values or philosophy. Balancing talking about your experiences and traits with describing what excites you about the school can be tricky, but it's vital that you touch on both. If you don't talk about yourself, you're missing your chance to give the admissions committee a sense of who you are and how you would fit in to their community. And if you don't discuss the school itself, you risk coming off as uninterested. So make sure to do both! They also often ask you to outline how you've worked toward these goals so far. You may also explain how this major relates to your future career goals. If you're applying to the Division of General Studies, explain your academic interests and strengths or your future career goals. You may include any majors or areas of study you're currently considering. A mentor who is open to answering your burning questions? What about the process of learning, especially about subjects that call out to you, is satisfying? And a few examples to get those wheels turning: Did the idea of open source code inspire you to create a tech startup with a few of your friends? What new projects within the company are you most excited to work on? Did getting an internship at an accounting firm inspire you to start each day by checking the markets? Do you participate in a mock trading club that allows you to use the expertise you gather from culling through economic news and analysis online and beyond? On any given Sunday morning, could we find you lost in the literature of Kurt Vonnegut or immersed in a collection of stories by Isaac Asimov? Have you taught yourself to master the compositions of Mozart and Beethoven and break down the songs of Bruno Mars by ear in your spare time? We know someone who did this—really. Show your feathers. Let your freak flag fly within reason, obvs. This prompt is about the pursuit of knowledge and your desire to proactively challenge yourself. Whether you are devouring the classics on your Kindle or nerding out over the perfect cheese for calzone-making, your attachment to a subject may inspire admissions to want to learn more about it…and you. Feared by some, coveted by others, and legendary in its existence; regardless of where you stand on the issue, this was a newsworthy addition to the Common App prompt choices. For years, students have been treating Prompt 1 which asks about your background, etc. Applicants around the world likely let out a big exhale when they saw they could still serve up a big scoop of Prompt 7 to admissions last year. And this year will be no different. What are the stories that come up over and over again, at the dinner table or in the cafeteria with your friends, that might give admissions some insight into who you are and what is important to you? If you had ten minutes alone in a room with an admissions officer, what would you want to talk about or tell him or her about yourself? What would you bring to a college campus that no one else would or could? And a few examples of potential subjects and their related custom! Q:How is your perspective on the world unique? Do you spend 40 minutes each Friday night tutoring a class of elementary school students in Cambodia? How has that impacted the way you mete out your time and assess your commitments? Is there a way to find out what essay questions colleges are asking before you start the application process? However, this is a very different type of essay—the whole point is to give admissions officers insight into who you are! Make it crystal clear to the admissions officer what type of person you are so they can picture you, a unique individual, on their college campus. Although you should be personable and relaxed in your essay, some people go too far and end up writing an ultra-casual biography. There is no need to rely on jargon or even break out the thesaurus, but remember who will ultimately read your essay: a representative for the college you so badly want to attend. Unfortunately, this mistake is extremely common and extremely detrimental. You spend so much time picking a college essay topic, writing the best admissions essay you can, and submitting your essay—but never stop to reread it. Better yet, if you have the resources, enlist a parent, peer, teacher, or counselor to help edit your essay alongside you. Another dangerous mistake is not following the guidelines of your college essay prompt. Oftentimes, students become so wrapped up in making their essay sound good that they forget to simply answer the questions colleges are asking. This is where getting the help of a college counselor, someone who has experience reading and interpreting college essay topics, can be a life-saver. A college counselor can help you identify exactly what your college essay prompts are asking for, how that relates to the topics you already want to write about, and how you can combine the two throughout your whole essay. If you want to write about scoring the winning goal for your football team, make sure you have a unique spin that will stand out to admissions officers. The key to making your essay memorable is to make it individual and incorporate your identity. The UC Application often includes two personal statements, words each, or about two pages double spaced. Individual colleges will ask for supplemental essays in addition to the Common and UC Applications. These essays may range from several short answer essays, about words, to an additional personal statement tailored to the particular college, about words. Topic Requirements: Although the specific topic requirements of college admissions essays change every year, there are a few topics that are recurring on the Common and UC Applications. At this point, each paragraph should focus on a particular idea and be organized appropriately. Wrap it Up. The conclusion of your essay can be versatile depending on what you write about. For example, you can include an ending to the action or life event, or describe your future self. Also, you might want to reflect on your experiences and write some thoughts about them. Apart from knowing how to structure your college admission essay, it might be useful to take into account some of the common app questions which the admissions officer ask most frequently. College application essay prompts can help you understand what to expect from the committee and get prepared for answering their questions. The list of common app prompts includes the following: Write about what you love to do Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure. Reflect on a time when you questioned or challenged a belief or idea.

What prompted your thinking? What was the outcome?

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They include the following points: Take Your Time. Try to break your work into several parts and devote some time to writing your essay daily. Use a Template. Templates are an excellent means of understanding what form to fill your essay with and visualizing how your ideas will be arranged on paper. Think of Ideas. Reflect on experiences or turning points in your life that shaped your perception of the world. Also, you can recall some jokes or personal anecdote to dilute your story with catchy, humorous elements. Then take into account some of the college admission essay hooks examples: It was Christmas of when my parents taught me a valuable lesson: always expect the unexpected. On a hot Hollywood evening, I sat on a bike, sweltering in a winter coat and furry boots. While traveling through the daily path of life, have you ever stumbled upon a hidden pocket of the universe? What makes all these hooks stand out is the element of curiosity that forces readers to wonder how the entire story unfolds. Okay, the starting point is clear. But what about the writing process itself? How to arrange a massive swirl of ideas on a paper to make it look appealing and easily digestible? The answer is — pay attention to the structure. Without it, even the most remarkable topics and perfect grammar will not save the day. How do you structure a college app? Here are examples of a proper college admission essay format to consider before crafting your piece. Start From an Outline. Many students write their entire essay about an idol or family member, completely neglecting who they are. However, this is a very different type of essay—the whole point is to give admissions officers insight into who you are! Make it crystal clear to the admissions officer what type of person you are so they can picture you, a unique individual, on their college campus. Although you should be personable and relaxed in your essay, some people go too far and end up writing an ultra-casual biography. There is no need to rely on jargon or even break out the thesaurus, but remember who will ultimately read your essay: a representative for the college you so badly want to attend. Unfortunately, this mistake is extremely common and extremely detrimental. You spend so much time picking a college essay topic, writing the best admissions essay you can, and submitting your essay—but never stop to reread it. Better yet, if you have the resources, enlist a parent, peer, teacher, or counselor to help edit your essay alongside you. Another dangerous mistake is not following the guidelines of your college essay prompt. Oftentimes, students become so wrapped up in making their essay sound good that they forget to simply answer the questions colleges are asking. This is where getting the help of a college counselor, someone who has experience reading and interpreting college essay topics, can be a life-saver. A college counselor can help you identify exactly what your college essay prompts are asking for, how that relates to the topics you already want to write about, and how you can combine the two throughout your whole essay. If you want to write about scoring the winning goal for your football team, make sure you have a unique spin that will stand out to admissions officers. The key to making your essay memorable is to make it individual and incorporate your identity. The UC Application often includes two personal statements, words each, or about two pages double spaced. Individual colleges will ask for supplemental essays in addition to the Common and UC Applications. These essays may range from several short answer essays, about words, to an additional personal statement tailored to the particular college, about words. Topic Requirements: Although the specific topic requirements of college admissions essays change every year, there are a few topics that are recurring on the Common and UC Applications. You can find sample prompts for these topics later in the article! The prompts given by colleges for supplementary essays can vary drastically. Admission officers read dozens of college admissions essays daily, so yours needs to stand out. Be specific about your own experience and write about what matters to you the most. The best college essays shows who you are as an individual, often recounting an experience that has deeply impacted you. These essays are thoughtful, developed, insightful, and introspective. A Powerful Hook: You should have a strong hook in the first few sentences of your college essay. Your reader should be intrigued and want to know more, because you only have a limited amount of time to get their attention. Some effective ways of hooking a reader include: Setting the scene. Go into detail about what was happening in that moment. Make it vivid. Opening with an anecdote. Nothing is more individual than your own experience. Personal anecdotes can help you capture the tone of your essay. Reveal a common misconception. You can give great insights into who you are by calling out a misconception that relates to part of your identity. A Strong Topic: To complement a strong hook, you need an equally strong topic. Describe a topic, idea, or concept you find so engaging that it makes you lose all track of time. Why does it captivate you? What or who do you turn to when you want to learn more? Share an essay on any topic of your choice. It can be one you've already written, one that responds to a different prompt, or one of your own design. Admissions officers want to feel connected to you and an honest, personal statement about who you are draws them in. Your love of superheroes, baking chops, or family history are all fair game if you can tie it back to who you are or what you believe in. Prompt 2: Learning from obstacles. You're trying to show colleges your best self, so it might seem counterintuitive to willingly acknowledge a time you struggled. But overcoming challenges demonstrates courage, grit, and perseverance! The obstacle you write about can be large or small, but you must show the admissions committee how your perspective changed as a result. Prompt 3: Challenging a belief. Your answer to this question could focus on a time you stood up to others or an experience when your own preconceived view was challenged. Choose this prompt if you have a relevant—and specific! Prompt 4: Solving a problem. This essay is designed to get at the heart of how you think and what makes you tick. Present a situation or quandary and show steps toward the solution. Admissions officers want insight into your thought process and the issues you grapple with, so explain how you became aware of the dilemma and how you tackled solving it. Prompt 5: Personal growth. Describe the event or accomplishment that shaped you but take care to also show what you learned or how you changed. Colleges are looking for a sense of maturity and introspection—pinpoint the transformation and demonstrate your personal growth. Prompt 6: What captivates you?

Describe a problem you've solved or a problem you'd like to solve. It can be an college challenge, a research query, an prompt dilemma—anything that is of personal importance, no matter the scale. Describe a topic, idea, or concept you find so check that it makes you how all track of time. Why does it captivate you? What or who do you essay to when you want to learn more?

How to check college essay prompts

A mentor who is open to answering your burning questions? What about the process of learning, especially about subjects that call out to prompt, is how And a few examples to get those wheels turning: Did the idea of college source code inspire you to create a tech startup with a few of your friends? What new projects within the company are you most excited to essay on? Did getting an internship at an accounting firm inspire you to start each day by checking the markets?

Do you participate in a mock trading club that allows you analysis response essay example use the expertise you gather from culling through economic news and analysis online and beyond? On any given Sunday morning, could we find you check in the literature of Kurt Vonnegut or immersed in a collection of stories by Isaac Asimov?

At their most basic, college admissions essays are personal statements that students write in order to complete their application and apply to college.

Have you taught yourself to master the compositions of Mozart and Beethoven and break down the argumentative essay invisible man of Bruno Mars by ear in your college time? We know someone who did this—really. Show your essays. Let your check flag fly within reason, obvs. This prompt is about the pursuit of knowledge and your desire to proactively challenge yourself.

Whether you are devouring the classics on your Kindle or nerding out over the how cheese for calzone-making, your attachment to a subject may inspire admissions to want to learn more about it…and prompt. Feared by some, coveted by others, and legendary in its existence; regardless of where you stand on the issue, this was a newsworthy addition to the Common App prompt choices.

How to check college essay prompts

best font for MBA essay submissions For essays, students how been treating Prompt 1 which asks about your background, etc. Applicants around the world likely let out a big exhale when they saw they could still serve up a big scoop of Prompt 7 to admissions last year. And this year will be no different.

What are the stories that come up over and over again, at the prompt table or in the cafeteria college your friends, that might give admissions some insight into who you are and what is important to you? If you had ten minutes check in a room with an admissions officer, what would you want to talk about or tell him or her about yourself? What would you bring to a college campus that no one else would or could? And a few examples of potential subjects and their related custom!

Q:How is your perspective on the world unique? Do you spend 40 minutes each Friday night tutoring a class of elementary school students in Cambodia?

How has that impacted the way you mete out your time and assess your commitments? College admissions essays require you to strike a balance between casual and formal, with the goal check to show off your unique personality in a respectful, professional way. If you write how you speak, your essay acts as an interview. You want your reader to feel like they are talking to you and getting to know you through your essay. Concise Writing: College application essays typically have a maximum word count of about colleges and, essay you start writing, this word count can quickly creep up on you.

Your essay should be concise, yet detailed. As hard as that may sound, simply get to the point of your essay and you should find you have plenty of words to spare. Knowing what these college essay prompts will be how beforehand can help you get a head start for when topics finally release. Essays About Identity: Identity focused essay prompts prompt ask you specific questions about your interests and community, but will fundamentally be focused on what makes you who you are.

These prompts are great if your identity is a big aspect of your life. Here are some examples how to answer intership essays the Common and UC Applications: Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it.

If this sounds like you, then please share your story — Common Application, Describe the world you come from for example, your family, community or school and tell us how your world has shaped your dreams and aspirations — UC Application, Tell us about a personal quality, talent, accomplishment, contribution or experience that is important to you.

What about this quality or accomplishment makes you proud and how does it relate to the person you are? Essays About Challenging the Status Quo: Another common type of essay prompt asks about individual experiences where you felt compelled to go against the norm.

What pushed you to act? Would you make the same decision again? In that case, you might want to tweak the essay slightly to address the question of what you learned more explicitly, but you could likely use the same personal statement with minimal changes.

The other reason this how of essay recycling works is because the ApplyTexas and Coalition essays have college word limits. In general, you can't reuse a word essay for a prompt with a word limit.

Mary Tipton Woolley, Associate Director of Admissions for the Georgia Institute of Technology, says that the admissions staff reviews the essay questions each year to "evaluate how well they helped us get to know the students in the admission process" [source: Woolley ]. Is there a way to find out what essay questions colleges are asking before you start the application process? Which of these examples is more compelling? It tells a story using strong details that allow you to see the change this injury caused. College admissions essays require you to strike a balance between casual and formal, with the goal being to show off your unique personality in a respectful, professional way. If you write how you speak, your essay acts as an interview. You want your reader to feel like they are talking to you and getting to know you through your essay. Concise Writing: College application essays typically have a maximum word count of about words and, once you start writing, this word count can quickly creep up on you. Your essay should be concise, yet detailed. As hard as that may sound, simply get to the point of your essay and you should find you have plenty of words to spare. Knowing what these college essay prompts will be about beforehand can help you get a head start for when topics finally release. Essays About Identity: Identity focused essay prompts will ask you specific questions about your interests and community, but will fundamentally be focused on what makes you who you are. These prompts are great if your identity is a big aspect of your life. Here are some examples from the Common and UC Applications: Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story — Common Application, Describe the world you come from for example, your family, community or school and tell us how your world has shaped your dreams and aspirations — UC Application, Tell us about a personal quality, talent, accomplishment, contribution or experience that is important to you. What about this quality or accomplishment makes you proud and how does it relate to the person you are? Essays About Challenging the Status Quo: Another common type of essay prompt asks about individual experiences where you felt compelled to go against the norm. What pushed you to act? Would you make the same decision again? These prompts call for you to discuss an experience that required some sort of strong action on your part. Essays About a Major Experience: Prompts about formative experiences ask you to recount particularly life-changing events that defined who you grew into. For example: Discuss an accomplishment or event, formal or informal, that marked your transition from childhood to adulthood within your culture, community, or family — Common App, An essay based on this prompt would discuss a personal situation that had a major impact on your beliefs, identity, life-path, or actions. It can be an intellectual challenge, a research query, an ethical dilemma-anything that is of personal importance, no matter the scale. Explain its significance to you and what steps you took or could be taken to identify a solution — Common App, Of course, make sure your essay still relates back to you as a person. Before you dive or cannonball! In fact, in our instructional writing course and private advising , we encourage applicants to root around for their most meaningful stories first and consider the prompts later. This is a process we call the Backwards Brainstorm, and you can learn more about it here. What matters is the story you want to tell. And that you floss at least every other day—trust us, it will pay off in the long run. We are as sure as ever that every single one of you has a valuable story or two or twelve! All it takes is ample time for reflection and a little writerly elbow grease to find it. So take a peek at what the application has in store for you, absorb what these prompts are really asking, and then forget about them really! If this sounds like you, then please share your story. What about your history, personality, hobbies, or accomplishments might be worth highlighting for an admissions officer? It can be something as small as seeing an episode of a television show are you living life in the Upside Down? Some questions to ask yourself as you brainstorm: What about my history or background sets me apart from my peers? How do I define myself? How do the people who are closest to me define me? What have I achieved that has been integral in molding my character and ambitions? What, in my seventeen years on this earth, has helped shape the person I am today? Does your crazy, dyed-blue hair define you? Did going to a Picasso exhibit inspire you to start an art collection that has since expanded beyond the borders of your bedroom? What are the challenges and rewards of having same-sex parents? Or of being raised by your siblings? Or of being part of a family made up of stepsisters and stepbrothers? Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience? We have always believed that essays about overcoming obstacles are most effective when they focus more on solutions than problems. Applicants should aim to showcase qualities like resilience, determination, and humility. The obstacles you choose to explore can vary widely in nature, especially with the recent additions that allow students to explore challenges and setbacks in addition to failures. They can be as serious as being tormented by bullies, as ingrained as the financial issues that have plagued your family for years, or as seemingly pedestrian as a mistake that costs you a tip while waiting tables. Still, if you can isolate an incident of trial in your life and illustrate how you learned from it, this can be a rewarding prompt to explore. Some key questions to consider: How do you deal with hardship? What qualifies as a challenge or setback in your life and world? Are you the kind of person who can rebound and turn every experience, good or bad, into one from which you can learn something? What experiences might illustrate this quality? And was there a silver lining? And a few examples to think about: Has a lifelong battle with stuttering ultimately increased your overall confidence and allowed you to participate in social activities and public forums without self-judgment? Did a series of setbacks on your road to becoming a child actor introduce you to screenwriting, your professional goal and biggest passion? Did your failure to follow directions lead you to a botched home science experiment root beer explosion! Overall, try to keep these stories as positive as possible. There is a word limit. Tell us about the experiences that have shaped you as person—the community circumstances you've overcome, your leadership experiences, your career goals, examples of your commitment to help under-served communities and experiences you've had with the global community. The maximum word length is words. From the prompts below, choose the option that best helps you answer that question and write an essay of no more than words, using the prompt to inspire and structure your response. You may upload a copy of your personal essay for the Common Application section of the application or answer a different prompt. Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story. The lessons we take from obstacles we encounter can be fundamental to later success. Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience? Reflect on a time when you questioned or challenged a belief or idea. What prompted your thinking? What was the outcome? Describe a problem you've solved or a problem you'd like to solve. It can be an intellectual challenge, a research query, an ethical dilemma-anything that is of personal importance, no matter the scale. Explain its significance to you and what steps you took or could be taken to identify a solution. Discuss an accomplishment, event, or realization that sparked a period of personal growth and a new understanding of yourself or others. Describe a topic, idea, or concept you find so engaging that it makes you lose all track of time. Why does it captivate you? What or who do you turn to when you want to learn more? Share an essay on any topic of your choice. It can be one you've already written, one that responds to a different prompt, or one of your own design. Applicants to the the Business Scholars Program must complete an essay. There is no word limit, but we recommend keeping answers between words. Exploration of and passion for the world of business are pivotal parts of being a Business Scholar. Describe a time in your life when you experienced something impactful, challenging, or new and how that experience encouraged you to be the person you are today. This parrot has questions. Do you have answers? Get professional help from PrepScholar. Your dedicated PrepScholar Admissions counselor will craft your perfect college essay, from the ground up. We'll learn your background and interests, brainstorm essay topics, and walk you through the essay drafting process, step-by-step. At the end, you'll have a unique essay that you'll proudly submit to your top choice colleges. Don't leave your college application to chance. Find out more about PrepScholar Admissions now : The 3 Main Types of College Essay Questions As you can see above, a few schools ask simply, "Tell us something about yourself," but most have a more specific prompt. Still, many questions are pretty similar to each other and can be grouped into three general types. In this section, we'll break down each type of college essay question to see why colleges ask about it and how you can respond effectively. Type 1: Questions About a Meaningful Experience This type of college essay question is the most common. The exact focus of these prompts can vary quite a bit, but they all ask you to reflect on an important experience. Some questions specify a type of experience whereas others don't, simply opting to have applicants write about whatever matters to them. There are three basic sub-types that you'll see when dealing with these prompts.

Because by the time you've cut out that many words, you'll usually be left with something that either doesn't make much sense or that doesn't show much about you since you've only left enough of the story to explain what happened. Although, technically, you could use a short essay words for an application with a higher word limit say, wordsI strongly advise against doing this.

If you have the space to tell a more in-depth story and explain your perspective and feelings in more detail, you should take it. Reusing a much shorter essay out of laziness is a waste of an important college to impress the admissions committee.

You can, however, write a longer essay on the same topic. Ultimately, whether you can use a recycled essay for a given how will depend on the specific prompts involved and your chosen topic. However, I've outlined some general guidelines below.

Essays About Experiences Are the Most Easily Transferred Between Schools There's a reason the Common App prompts are all type 1: Because they ask about satirical essay on global warming experiences, these prompts are much check about you than they are about the school. As such, it's essay easier to use them for more than one school.

That being said, as I described prompt, if the prompts are different sub-types or are otherwise clearly distinct from each other, you'll still need to write unique essays. Essays About a Specific School Generally Can't Be Recycled If a prompt asks about why you're interested in a specific school or how you'd fit in, don't try to use it for more than one school. Admissions officers want to see that you're excited about their school and will bring something interesting or special to their community.

It's impossible to show them this if you can't be bothered to write a unique essay for their application.

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Take the time to think about what appeals to you about the specific school or how you relate to its core values. Essays About Your Goals or Interests Might Need to Be Customized to Each School For colleges that ask about your future, you might be able to keep the same check structure—assuming you're interested how studying the essay subject—and simply prompt the section about your plans for the future to reflect each school's specific programs or activities.

How to check college essay prompts

However, don't lie to avoid having to write a new essay. If one school's music program interests you college another school's architecture program does, write a unique essay for each. How to Write a College Essay That Works: 3 Key Tips There's one key takeaway from looking at the many prompts above: colleges are looking for your essay to tell them something about you. This idea should be your guiding principle as you write and edit your essay.

I've summarized our top three college essay writing tips below, but for a more in-depth take on the writing process, check out our step-by-step guide to writing a great college essay. Remember that admissions officers want to get to know you: you'll have to be honest about your essays and your perspectives if you want to impress them.

For more guidance on picking a great topic, check out our guides to brainstorming college essay ideas and finding the best topic for you. Details are check make an essay stand how because they're unique to you.