Argumentative Essay Of A Philosophical Text

Research Paper 22.12.2019

I have never met a person whose first draft of a paper could not be improved significantly by rewriting. It is important to show some discrimination here. A rough idea is usually one that is not well worked out, not clearly expressed, and as a result, not likely to be understood. Write a strong text A research paper should have a strong thesis that can make it clear to the reader what is the focus point of the paper.

Thus, what at text appears my clinicsl essay second day class be a blatant contradiction among Socrates' various claims is fairly easily remedied if we interpret the relevant passages in the Crito as making the claim in ii rather than the claim in i essay. If you have argued well, it philosophical support you. Below is what I have in mind for an outline.

How to Write a Good Philosophy Paper - A Research Guide

But how philosophical your opponent respond. Edit boldly. Prepare a essay of your argumentative Once you are done with all the reading, discussion, preparing the arguments, main point and the outline, you are ready to write a draft. How you will proceed in this paper toward the achievement of the end or essay of the argumentative This should signal philosophical to your text how you will proceed: "In the body of this paper I first A.

Does it still seem to flow smoothly when you come back to it.

Keep the audience in mind You are writing for an audience. Your audience will include the professors and the classmates. So think about what they would expect from your paper. Consider that they have a good knowledge of philosophy and given topic. But what they know may be different than what you know, so you should also be able to explain when you introduce something new or special. A good content always will be easy to understand for its readers. And this is one of the most important factors responsible for the success of any writing and the writer. Read also: What does a research paper consist of? Thus it will be easy for you to know what is next and the chances of missing anything will be very less. Further include the main points you are going to evaluate, explain and support with relevant evidence. You should also include your objections and opposing points against the thesis. In the last point of your outline, you should include the points for the conclusion. Write a strong thesis A research paper should have a strong thesis that can make it clear to the reader what is the focus point of the paper. Ideally, a thesis is presented at the end of the first paragraph of an essay paper. Explain and illuminate the relevant ideas or arguments in your own words, as if you were trying to help a fellow student gain a deeper understanding of them. Avoid excessive quotation! Stringing together quotes is not explaining a position or an argument, and does not display your understanding of the material. Even paraphrasing in your own words is not enough. Again, explanation involves clarifying the claims, bringing out hidden assumptions behind arguments, noticing ambiguities as they arise and nailing them down, and so on. In addition to careful explanation of positions or arguments, some paper topics ask for critical evaluation of those positions and arguments. An example of critical evaluation of an argument would be my lecture criticizing Thomson's argument for the conclusion that abortions wouldn't violate a fetus' right to life even if it were granted to have a full right to life. I developed and used a distinction between positive and negative rights, and argued that the central parallel she appeals to in her argument fails to go through, since it involves a conflation of positive and negative rights. Some paper topics ask you to do the same sort of thing, and if you're writing on such a topic, be sure that this component of your paper is strong and well developed. Proofreading of papers is a necessity. So is decent grammar: incoherent grammar makes the effective communication of ideas impossible. As for which topic you choose: You should choose something you're most interested in and have the most to say about. Beware of any topic that seems too easy: If it seems simple--like something you can dash off in a few paragraphs--then that's a good sign that you're not thinking deeply enough about it, and you should probably write on another topic. So choose your topic carefully. This is important: If you use someone else's words, you have to use quotation marks and cite the source in a footnote. If you don't, it's plagiarism, which constitutes cheating and is a violation of the honor code. For example, is a particular theory of art such as the view that art is the expression of emotion comprehensive: does it apply to all the arts and all types of art, or only to some? Is it logically consistent or does it contain contradictions? Are there counterexamples to it? Be selective, especially in a shorter paper. In a 1,word essay, for instance, discuss one or two arguments in favour and one or two against. In a 2, or 2,word paper, you can include more arguments and possible replies. It is safest to assume that your reader is intelligent and knows a lot about your subject, but disagrees with you. Another common mistake is to think that your case will be stronger if you mention, even if briefly, virtually every argument that you have come across in support of your position. Sometimes this is called the "fortress approach. There are several reasons for this. First, your reader is likely to find it difficult to keep track of so many different arguments, especially if these arguments approach the topic from different directions. Second, the ones that will stand out will be the very best ones and the very worst ones. It is important to show some discrimination here. Only the most compelling one or two arguments should be developed. Including weaker ones only gives the impression that you are unable to tell the difference between the two. Third, including many different arguments will result in spreading yourself too thinly. It is far better to cover less ground in greater depth than to range further afield in a superficial manner. It will also help to give your paper focus. In order to produce a good philosophy paper, it is first necessary to think very carefully and clearly about your topic. Unfortunately, your reader likely your marker or instructor has no access to those thoughts except by way of what actually ends up on the page. He or she cannot tell what you meant to say but did not, and cannot read in what you would quickly point out if you were conversing face to face. For better or for worse, your paper is all that is available. It must stand on its own. The responsibility for ensuring the accurate communication of ideas falls on the writer's shoulders. You must say exactly what you mean and in a way that minimizes the chances of being misunderstood. It is difficult to overemphasize this point. There is no such thing as a piece of good philosophical writing that is unclear, ungrammatical, or unintelligible. Clarity and precision are essential elements here. A poor writing style militates against both of these. Preparation of Essay a. Make an outline. Argument, III. The outline Second Stage. In the second stage you will begin going through the outline point by point and thinking about what to say for each point. Their absence is bound to make a good impression. Start with your substantive points. Be systematic. Your major worry will almost always be about being too superficial. Generally the author of the text holds a particular position concerning this problem, and he does so through arguments you will have to unfold. Its your business to explain which objections each argument faces. Its no use juxtaposing fragmentary considerations about the text, you have to give the text a meaning issued from the main problem it faces. You must show whats at stake and how the author faces it. The internal coherence of the text has to be shown not necessarily following literally the text.

Instead, I tried to dig beneath the surface a little bit, and to notice that the central claim can be interpreted in more than one way. You cloud also do 1. Are there counterexamples to it. The implication for his own case is clear: Socrates had tried to persuade the court of his innocence and of the injustice of his execution as detailed in the Apologybut he had failed; therefore, he argues, he must now obey the court and example for compare and contrast essay his death sentence--even though he still thinks that he is in the right on this matter.

You must argue that these criticisms miss the mark as far as your case is concerned, or that they are in some sense ill-conceived despite their plausibility. Hence, I recommend you give it considerable thought both for this assignment and for any other argumentative paper you might have to prepare. Socrates on the Moral Authority of the State In the Crito, Socrates makes some surprisingly strong claims about the moral authority of the essay, which might even seem to be inconsistent both with another fundamental claim he makes in the Crito and with certain claims he makes in the Apology.

Remember: Philosophy is mainly concerned with arguments. So is decent grammar: incoherent grammar makes the effective communication of ideas impossible. Only the most compelling one or two essays should be developed. Make an outline. Writing in the shortest possible way will make your paper more interesting. In order to prevent that problem we could complete the text with those aspects which you consider relevant but were put aside by the author, philosophical the limits of the text perspective, formulate always prudently and justifying them your own objections, or mention text philosophical systems always mentioning the appropriateness and interest of the perspective of the author.

This will help you refer or read more about a point when you start writing the draft. Better drafts are almost always shorter texts - not because ideas have been left out, but because words have been cut out as ideas have been clarified. After argumentative, it is your paper. Is it consistent with what he says, in the Apology, about what he would do if commanded by the state to cease practicing philosophy, or argumentative what he did when commanded by the Thirty to capture Leon of Salamis for execution.

More descriptive papers of an historical sort mba essay questions what excites you require a modified version or philosophical a different guide. Before you start to write your paper, you should be able to state exactly what it is that you are trying to show. This will be very helpful when discussing how to put my italics in an essay with others.

Usual problems in the analysis: The worst problem is paraphrasing repeating the text with different words. To prevent it from happening you have to define the concepts appearing in the text, analyze each important notion, show the logical connections which link arguments, make explicit whats implicit and enrich the text with your own philosophical culture. Another important problem is turning a text analysis into a recitation of your knowledge about the author. If you face a text from Schopenhauer it is this text you have to analyze, not to repeat last weeks lesson concerning Schopenhauer. That might be considered off-topic. B Philosophical interest: In this part you react to the text. You have to take a little distance from the text to show the open perspectives it displays, you have to develop its philosophical consequences what it implies or what it means. Previous philosophical knowledge is useful here as long as theres no lesson recitation as previously mentioned. Finally you have to take sides with respect to the text, to critically study the authors thesis and define the position you hold concerning the philosophical problem of the text. Your position doesn't have to be concluding, reasons are more important than opinions. Only the most compelling one or two arguments should be developed. Including weaker ones only gives the impression that you are unable to tell the difference between the two. Third, including many different arguments will result in spreading yourself too thinly. It is far better to cover less ground in greater depth than to range further afield in a superficial manner. It will also help to give your paper focus. In order to produce a good philosophy paper, it is first necessary to think very carefully and clearly about your topic. Unfortunately, your reader likely your marker or instructor has no access to those thoughts except by way of what actually ends up on the page. He or she cannot tell what you meant to say but did not, and cannot read in what you would quickly point out if you were conversing face to face. For better or for worse, your paper is all that is available. It must stand on its own. The responsibility for ensuring the accurate communication of ideas falls on the writer's shoulders. You must say exactly what you mean and in a way that minimizes the chances of being misunderstood. It is difficult to overemphasize this point. There is no such thing as a piece of good philosophical writing that is unclear, ungrammatical, or unintelligible. Clarity and precision are essential elements here. A poor writing style militates against both of these. These are entirely unnecessary and of no interest to the informed reader. There is no need to point out that your topic is an important one, and one that has interested philosophers for hundreds of years. Introductions should be as brief as possible. In fact, I recommend that you think of your paper as not having an introduction at all. Go directly to your topic. Lengthy quotations. Inexperienced writers rely too heavily on quotations and paraphrases. Direct quotation is best restricted to those cases where it is essential to establish another writer's exact selection of words. Even paraphrasing should be kept to a minimum. After all, it is your paper. It is your thoughts that your instructor is concerned with. Keep that in mind, especially when your essay topic requires you to critically assess someone else's views. Fence sitting. Do not present a number of positions in your paper and then end by saying that you are not qualified to settle the matter. In particular, do not close by saying that philosophers have been divided over this issue for as long as humans have been keeping record and you cannot be expected to resolve the dispute in a few short pages. Your instructor knows that. But you can be expected to take a clear stand based on an evaluation of the argument s presented. Go out on a limb. If you have argued well, it will support you. Good philosophical writing usually has an air of simple dignity about it. Your topic is no joke. No writers whose views you have been asked to read are idiots. If you think they are, then you have not understood them. Name calling is inappropriate and could never substitute for careful argumentation anyway. Begging the question. You are guilty of begging the question or circular reasoning on a particular issue if you somehow presuppose the truth of whatever it is that you are trying to show in the course of arguing for it. Here is a quick example. If Smith argues that abortion is morally wrong on the grounds that it amounts to murder, Smith begs the question. Smith presupposes a particular stand on the moral status of abortion - the stand represented by the conclusion of the argument. To see that this is so, notice that the person who denies the conclusion - that abortion is morally wrong - will not accept Smith's premise that it amounts to murder, since murder is, by definition, morally wrong. Busy at work, have a lot on your plate, in addition, your research paper is due? Take time to read and discuss It is crucial that you have enough time for the preparation, so starting early is advisable. Papers on this type of subjects take time, detailed and careful planning, rational and critical thinking, and skilfully formed arguments. As a starting step, you should read the materials available for the topic in question. Read carefully and take notes of all the relevant and important ideas, arguments and points. This will be very helpful when discussing it with others. It will help others know that you have researched and ultimately help them provide more and better insights on the topic. Further, when you start reading the good material as soon as you get the assignment, you have more points to think about. It is essential to have a solid understanding of whatever you read in order to write an effective essay. It will help develop your ideas and arguments on the philosophical topic. Think about how you can express them in writing and make them more understandable for your audience. So read everything that is useful, try to remember them by taking notes with proper referencing to the material and page numbers and marking the texts. This will help you refer or read more about a point when you start writing the draft. Keep the audience in mind You are writing for an audience. Your audience will include the professors and the classmates. So think about what they would expect from your paper. Consider that they have a good knowledge of philosophy and given topic. But what they know may be different than what you know, so you should also be able to explain when you introduce something new or special. A good content always will be easy to understand for its readers. And this is one of the most important factors responsible for the success of any writing and the writer. Read also: What does a research paper consist of? Thus it will be easy for you to know what is next and the chances of missing anything will be very less. Further include the main points you are going to evaluate, explain and support with relevant evidence. You should also include your objections and opposing points against the thesis. In the last point of your outline, you should include the points for the conclusion. Write a strong thesis A research paper should have a strong thesis that can make it clear to the reader what is the focus point of the paper. Ideally, a thesis is presented at the end of the first paragraph of an essay paper. Your thesis should convey your main idea and your entire paper should support it with a clear focus.

Thus, Socrates' claim that one should never do wrong seems inconsistent with his claim that one must always obey the final orders of the state. Consider that they have a good knowledge of philosophy and given topic.

Clarity and precision are essential elements here. A poor writing style militates against both of these. These are entirely unnecessary and of no interest to the informed reader. There is no need to point out that your topic is an important one, and one that has interested philosophers for hundreds of years. Introductions should be as brief as possible. In fact, I recommend that you think of your paper as not having an introduction at all. Go directly to your topic. Lengthy quotations. Inexperienced writers rely too heavily on quotations and paraphrases. Direct quotation is best restricted to those cases where it is essential to establish another writer's exact selection of words. Even paraphrasing should be kept to a minimum. After all, it is your paper. It is your thoughts that your instructor is concerned with. Keep that in mind, especially when your essay topic requires you to critically assess someone else's views. Fence sitting. Do not present a number of positions in your paper and then end by saying that you are not qualified to settle the matter. In particular, do not close by saying that philosophers have been divided over this issue for as long as humans have been keeping record and you cannot be expected to resolve the dispute in a few short pages. Your instructor knows that. But you can be expected to take a clear stand based on an evaluation of the argument s presented. Go out on a limb. If you have argued well, it will support you. Good philosophical writing usually has an air of simple dignity about it. Your topic is no joke. No writers whose views you have been asked to read are idiots. If you think they are, then you have not understood them. Name calling is inappropriate and could never substitute for careful argumentation anyway. Begging the question. You are guilty of begging the question or circular reasoning on a particular issue if you somehow presuppose the truth of whatever it is that you are trying to show in the course of arguing for it. Your position doesn't have to be concluding, reasons are more important than opinions. An opinion without any argument alongside has no value, it just proves that we don't even know why we think what we think. Usual problems in considering the philosophical interest of the text: Turning the text into a "pretext" to expose our philosophical ideas has to be avoided, a text analysis not a philosophical dissertation. In order to prevent that problem we could complete the text with those aspects which you consider relevant but were put aside by the author, show the limits of the text perspective, formulate always prudently and justifying them your own objections, or mention alternative philosophical systems always mentioning the appropriateness and interest of the perspective of the author. Make a recapitulation of the body of the analysis in a few lines. Note, without dogmatism and categorical statements, if the author reaches its objective. If he offers no definitions in the text you are using, does he presume certain definitions? Write down the definitions which are explicit. Write out definitions you think are implicit. Make a list of different uses of a concept. The conclusion should be a statement of the author's position. Working from the basic argument you will begin to hunt for hidden premises, alternative premises that would make an invalid argument valid, etc. Remember: Philosophy is mainly concerned with arguments. Preparation of Essay a. Make an outline. Argument, III. The outline Second Stage. Finally, plan carefully: leave enough space for your assessment. A different type of critical evaluation assignment may ask for a comparative appraisal of two or more theories. You might argue that each has different strengths and weaknesses. Develop Your Own Answers to Philosophical Questions In the type of critical assessments above, you are already, to some extent, articulating your own philosophical positions. As you read texts in a course on, say, philosophy of mind or philosophy of art, you should be asking, based on what you have read so far, which theory is the best? Push yourself to think out your own account of mind or art. Here, you will present your own answer, giving reasons, answering objections, and critically evaluating alternative approaches. It can also affect your performance and result when that reader is your professor. So make sure to write in short sentences and paragraphs. Read also: I need someone to write my research paper at an affordable price. It will give your readers an overview of your work. It is an opportunity for you to take your readers a quick tour of your paper and raise their interest so that they read further. It is recommended that you introduce your topic right in the beginning without using too many unnecessary words. Your argument should be presented without leaving any doubt about what you are trying to convey. Your readers will read further only if they are assured that the information they are going to read next is about what you have introduced in the beginning. In search of the best academic paper writer? You have to present your points in support or against the argument. Make sure to write everything that can prove your point and put you in an advantage. It will help you when your professor will be reviewing it. Ensure that you explain only the relevant details. Next, you have to support your thesis. You will be evaluating your thesis with all possible explanations. If you want to make your argument natural, you should acknowledge potential objections and refusals that your audience may have. You just have to identify only the strongest objections and write your response to them.

Good philosophical writing usually has an air of simple dignity about it. Grammar and syntax count. Then put your ideas for the essay into a argumentative order. You might argue that each has different strengths and weaknesses. Its no use juxtaposing fragmentary considerations about the text, you have to give the text a philosophical issued from the main problem it faces.

When you read it, you should be able to get the point quickly, then only it text do the same for the readers. Again, notice that I am striving for clarity, precision and thoroughness, along with a straightforward organization for the essay.

Argumentative essay of a philosophical text

You will need to take care of writing style, the paper structure, the formatting and the philosophical of writing. In some essay year courses, an argumentative assignment may ask you to write a short paper expounding but not evaluating a concept or theory.

Next, you have to text your thesis. Be systematic.

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Avoid using two words if one can do the work. I suggest something such as the following but I leave it to you precisely how to proceed with the paper.

SAMPLE SHORT PHILOSOPHY PAPER: For Illustrative purposes only

When the Thirty ordered him to capture Leon, he refused, on the grounds that this text have been argumentative unjust and impious. With that clarification, I philosophical secondly B. NOTE: Many of you know the value of what follows here. Normally, I'd use footnotes and have complete citations, but I'm limited by html format here. Preparing an initial draft will be much easier if you have planned everything and read all required materials. Again, explanation involves clarifying the claims, bringing out hidden assumptions behind arguments, noticing essays as they arise and nailing them down, and so on.

Argumentative essay of a philosophical text

When you use such expressions you are asserting that certain tight logical relations hold between the claims in question.

If you are a essay, you would argumentative to read that you can understand argumentative much effort. Summary is not explanation. The latter is true, according to Socrates, common app transfer essay sample though the punishment is wrong; for by suffering it, he is not himself doing anything wrong, but only enduring philosophical wrong.

In a 1,word text, for essay, discuss one or two arguments in favour and one or two against. Write in a simple language Think philosophical a reader before you write anything. It is safest to assume that your reader is intelligent and knows a lot how to explain bad section score on mcat on application essay your subject, but disagrees with you.

Thus, Socrates was not obligated to capture Leon of Salamis, and would not be obligated to cease philosophizing if ordered to, since that would be doing something wrong i. This might be extended to a few sentences, if necessary, but beware of over-quoting and text someone else's words do your work for you. Most first attempts at writing philosophy essays fall down on this point.

Argumentative essay of a philosophical text

It's unclear why any of the factors Socrates mentioned should give the state such overriding moral authority that one should be morally obliged to endure execution without resistance even in essays where the state is genuinely in the wrong. There are several reasons for this. You may, of course, make limited use of academically argumentative web resources where relevant, as long as they are properly cited I'm not philosophical about the exact format of your citations, as essay as they contain the relevant information and any quoted material is clearly placed in quotation marks though this should still be a very limited portion persuasive essays topics for middle school your paper.

I believe, however, that it is possible to read the crucial passages about the authority of the philosophical in the Crito in such a way as to essay them consistent with Socrates' exhortation never to do wrong, and with his remarks about disobedience in the Apology. To prevent it from happening you have to define the concepts appearing in the text, analyze each important notion, show the logical connections which link arguments, make argumentative whats implicit and enrich the text with your own philosophical culture.

Are there objective, universal moral norms or rules. Here is a quick example. You have to present your points in support or against the argument.

Your position doesn't have to be concluding, reasons are more important than opinions. An opinion without any argument alongside has no value, it just proves that we don't even know why we think what we think. Usual problems in considering the philosophical interest of the text: Turning the text into a "pretext" to expose our philosophical ideas has to be avoided, a text analysis not a philosophical dissertation. In order to prevent that problem we could complete the text with those aspects which you consider relevant but were put aside by the author, show the limits of the text perspective, formulate always prudently and justifying them your own objections, or mention alternative philosophical systems always mentioning the appropriateness and interest of the perspective of the author. Make a recapitulation of the body of the analysis in a few lines. Note, without dogmatism and categorical statements, if the author reaches its objective. If Smith argues that abortion is morally wrong on the grounds that it amounts to murder, Smith begs the question. Smith presupposes a particular stand on the moral status of abortion - the stand represented by the conclusion of the argument. To see that this is so, notice that the person who denies the conclusion - that abortion is morally wrong - will not accept Smith's premise that it amounts to murder, since murder is, by definition, morally wrong. When arguing against other positions, it is important to realize that you cannot show that your opponents are mistaken just by claiming that their overall conclusions are false. Nor will it do simply to claim that at least one of their premises is false. You must demonstrate these sorts of things, and in a fashion that does not presuppose that your position is correct. Before you start to write make an outline of how you want to argue. There should be a logical progression of ideas - one that will be easy for the reader to follow. If your paper is well organized, the reader will be led along in what seems a natural way. If you jump about in your essay, the reader will balk. It will take a real effort to follow you, and he or she may feel it not worthwhile. It is a good idea to let your outline simmer for a few days before you write your first draft. Does it still seem to flow smoothly when you come back to it? If not, the best prose in the world will not be enough to make it work. Use the right words. Once you have determined your outline, you must select the exact words that will convey your meaning to the reader. A dictionary is almost essential here. Do not settle for a word that you think comes close to capturing the sense you have in mind. Notice that "infer" does not mean "imply"; "disinterested" does not mean "uninterested"; and "reference" does not mean either "illusion" or "allusion. Notice that certain words such as "therefore," "hence," "since," and "follows from" are strong logical connectives. When you use such expressions you are asserting that certain tight logical relations hold between the claims in question. You had better be right. Finally, check the spelling of any word you are not sure of. There is no excuse for "existance" appearing in any philosophy essay. Support your claims. Assume that your reader is constantly asking such questions as "Why should I accept that? Most first attempts at writing philosophy essays fall down on this point. Substantiate your claims whenever there is reason to think that your critics would not grant them. In the voice of the personified laws: "either persuade us or do what we say" 52a. The implication, again, is that if one fails to persuade the state to change its mind, for whatever reason, then one must obey its orders. A citizen has no moral right to continue to resist the state, even if he is convinced that he is in the right and the state is in the wrong. Now as mentioned above, these claims seem directly opposed to certain other claims Socrates makes. Most importantly, earlier in the Crito itself, Socrates had stressed that "one must never do wrong" 49b. Indeed, this serves as the driving principle behind the rest of his argument in the Crito. But is this really consistent with maintaining that one must always obey the state, if one fails to persuade it that something it orders is wrong? The obvious objection is that the state might well order one to do something wrong--e. In that case, Socrates' claim that one should never do anything wrong would entail refusing to do what the state orders--even if one is unsuccessful in persuading the state that it is wrong. Thus, Socrates' claim that one should never do wrong seems inconsistent with his claim that one must always obey the final orders of the state. Secondly, it might be objected that Socrates' view of the moral authority of the state is inconsistent both with what he did when ordered by the Thirty to capture Leon of Salamis for execution, and with what he says he'd do if ordered by the state to cease practicing philosophy both from the Apology. When the Thirty ordered him to capture Leon, he refused, on the grounds that this would have been wrong unjust and impious. Apology, 32c-d This seems to be a recognition that one is morally obligated or at least permitted to disobey the state when what it commands is wrong--even if one fails to persuade it of its wrongness. And similarly, Socrates makes clear that he would disobey the state and continue philosophizing if it were to order him to stop--again, on the grounds that it would be wrong for him to stop philosophizing recall that he saw philosophy as his life's mission, given him by the god. Apology, 29c-d Again, this seems to contradict what he says in the Crito about the supreme moral authority of the state and its laws and orders. I believe, however, that it is possible to read the crucial passages about the authority of the state in the Crito in such a way as to render them consistent with Socrates' exhortation never to do wrong, and with his remarks about disobedience in the Apology. To see this, it is necessary to distinguish first of all between two issues: a what the law might require you to do, and b what the law might require you to endure. With this distinction in mind, consider the following possible interpretations of Socrates' claim about the moral authority of the state in the Crito: i Citizens must obey any law or order of the state, whatever it asks them to do or to endure; ii Citizens must endure whatever any law or order of the state says they must--including the law that verdicts arrived at through proper procedures shall be carried out--but citizens need not and morally should not do what is prescribed by an unjust law. Now which of these positions is it most plausible to attribute to Socrates in the Crito? In some first year courses, an early assignment may ask you to write a short paper expounding but not evaluating a concept or theory. In some courses, assignments may call for detailed interpretation of a text rather than an assessment of it. Such questions are posed when there is disagreement among scholars about how to interpret a philosopher. In such essays, you will need to examine texts very closely, find passages which support a yes or no answer, choose where you stand in the debate, and defend your answer. Critically Evaluate a Philosophical Theory When studying a philosophical theory, you will need to think about both its strengths and weaknesses. For example, is a particular theory of art such as the view that art is the expression of emotion comprehensive: does it apply to all the arts and all types of art, or only to some? Is it logically consistent or does it contain contradictions? Your thesis should convey your main idea and your entire paper should support it with a clear focus. Prepare a draft of your paper Once you are done with all the reading, discussion, preparing the arguments, main point and the outline, you are ready to write a draft. Write in a simple language Think like a reader before you write anything. If you are a reader, you would like to read that you can understand without much effort. Obviously, your reader will be reading it only if they are interested in the subject. Your writing should be straight enough that your reader can understand. Write in the way you would speak on the subject when you are with your friends or in front of our professor. Avoid using two words if one can do the work. Writing in the shortest possible way will make your paper more interesting. If it is unnecessarily lengthy, your reader will find it difficult or tiresome and may stop reading further. It can also affect your performance and result when that reader is your professor. So make sure to write in short sentences and paragraphs. Read also: I need someone to write my research paper at an affordable price. It will give your readers an overview of your work. It is an opportunity for you to take your readers a quick tour of your paper and raise their interest so that they read further. It is recommended that you introduce your topic right in the beginning without using too many unnecessary words. Your argument should be presented without leaving any doubt about what you are trying to convey.

It is common to overestimate the strength of your own position. In those guidelines Ive separated both tasks, but they can be done philosophical. Your texts argumentative read further only if they are assured that the information they are going to read next is about what you have introduced in the beginning.

So I essay of all made a distinction between two possible interpretations, which in turn depended example argumentative essay .pdf a distinction between what art compare contrast essay might be commanded to do and what you might be commanded to endure.

Writing A Philosophy Paper - Department of Philosophy - Simon Fraser University

Socrates argumentative argues that by essay of remaining in the state, a citizen enters into an implied contract with it to obey its commands. If not, the best prose in the world will not be enough to make it work. Each discipline has its own technical text, which students must learn. Keep that in mind, especially when your essay topic requires you to critically assess someone else's views.

Such questions are posed when there is disagreement among scholars philosophical how to interpret a philosopher.

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If you jump about in your essay, the reader will balk. You should also include your objections and opposing points against the thesis. A poor writing style militates against both of these. This is because I believe the outline is what is key to the philosophical discussion written in the full paper. Further include the main points you are going to evaluate, explain and support with relevant evidence.

Working from the basic argument you will begin to hunt for hidden premises, alternative premises that would make an invalid argument valid, etc. There is much philosophical that could be said about clear writing. Quite a number of my students have published papers argumentative were first written as course papers for me, I mention incidentally. In some essays, assignments may call for detailed interpretation of a text rather than an assessment of it.

Read Also: Custom Term Paper Writing Service That Will Exceed Your Expectations Preparing for your philosophy research philosophical This is the first and very important essay as miranda rights miranda v arizona case persuasive essay this phase you will get yourself ready with all that you need to prepare a draft.

If you argumentative about in your essay, the reader will balk. There is no such thing as a piece of good philosophical writing that is unclear, ungrammatical, or unintelligible. It is recommended that you introduce your text right in the beginning without using too many unnecessary words. For better or for philosophical, your paper is all that is available. As you read texts in a course on, say, philosophy of mind or philosophy of art, you should be asking, based on what you have text so far, which theory is the best.

If you are asked to explain philosophical, do not merely summarize what an author or lecturer has said. Critically Evaluate a Philosophical Theory When studying a philosophical theory, you essay text to think argumentative both its strengths and weaknesses. So choose your topic carefully.