Who Shot Johnny Analysis -essay

Review 09.09.2019

The Boston Observers gather for one final meeting—they will not meet again because the British are starting to notice. Johnny manages to get fruit for the punch from Mrs. Bessie, and he and Rab make the punch. The boys are asked to stay for the meeting, and Sam Adams leads a discussion about why war has to come. Adams is interrupted by James Otis, who wasn't invited but came anyway.

Otis says he knows they all think he's lost his mind, and then he talks for a long time about how they are johnny for shot than who, for more than Englishmen. They are fighting to free the world from oppression.

He sums up his johnnies with the phrase, "A man can stand up" 8. Chapter 9 The Scarlet Deluge Paul Revere organizes a spy analysis consisting of thirty artisans, and who shot secretly at the Green Dragon tavern.

The British don't suspect anything because the Green Dragon is owned by the Masons—a worldwide johnny society—and the men are mostly Masons. Johnny continues to work in the stables at the Afric Queen.

His spy job is to who track of the soldiers shot he's also supposed to stay tight with Dove, who is still working for the British.

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He also asks Cilla to fetch his horse, Goblin, from the Afric Queen and keep him safe in the Lytes' pastures. Johnny suggests that Mr. Lorne and his family can move to the Lytes' and stay in the coachman's quarters, caring for Goblin and the other animals. There, Mr. Lorne can conceal his identity from the British, who are after him for publishing the anti-British Boston Observer. Analysis Johnny struggles with conflicting loyalties. He sees Lieutenant Stranger, a redcoat, return from the battlefield and resists the urge to reach out to help him, even though they became friends in the tense period leading up to the war. Through Johnny's experiences, readers might recall the words of the medical officer: "We're all one people, you know. Dickerson more than sufficiently accomplishes both of the goals she had. She accomplished her first goal by detailing the perpetual pain and discomfort in which her nephew would live the rest of his life. She also tells us about her realization that in a matter of seconds her nephew lost his lively hood — he had been paralyzed. The article is very structured and formal until the end. He gives Johnny another lecture about pride, while Johnny is like, "Dude, are you running a business here or what? Lapham is a bit more practical, and she decides they're going to get Grandpa Lapham out of the way and engage in some good old-fashioned Sabbath breaking. On Sunday afternoon, everyone in the house is engaged in helping Johnny get that sugar basin made, especially our old friend Dove who sees a chance to get back at Johnny. He gives him a cracked crucible. A crucible—aside from being a play by Arthur Miller —is a vessel used to melt silver, and if it's damaged, the heat will break it. Frankly, this next part hurts to read. Molten silver spills everywhere. Johnny's hand comes down on it. Guess why they can't call a doctor? It's Sunday. Johnny is Sabbath breaking, and the rest of them are aiding and abetting. If they call a doctor, they'll definitely get caught, so they call the midwife instead. Johnny spends the next few days in a pain, infection, and laudanum-induced haze. When they finally take the bandages off, Johnny's thumb is attached to his palm. Goodbye, silversmith career. The part Johnny hates the most is the way the girls—except for Cilla—scream and recoil from his hand; for several weeks, he wanders around Boston during the day feeling sorry for himself and being rude to everyone. Finally, Mr. Lapham sits him down and tells him he'll have to look for a new trade and that he needs to forgive Dove. Oh—and that this is God's punishment for his pride. Way to be helpful, Grandpa Lapham. Also, this is the first Johnny knew of Dove's involvement, so yeah, he swears revenge. Unfortunately, job hunting can be severely inhibited when you spend your days sulking about how you're too good for soap-making and butchery and just want your old job back. Also, Johnny has developed a dramatic flair for pulling his injured hand out of his pocket and waiting for everyone to scream. Lapham is done with Johnny's attitude and is also done with him not pulling his weight. In response, Johnny tries to eat as little as possible, but he often finds snacks Cilla tucks in his jacket pockets. Because Dove and Dusty are no good on their own, Mrs. Lapham is trying to bring a new master silversmith, Mr. Tweedie, into the business. One day, Johnny steps into the offices of the Boston Observer. He meets and eats lunch with the printer's boy, Rab, who is the first person who has had anything sensible to say about his hand in two months. Rab tells him to come back if he can't find work: they can offer him a newspaper delivery route, which isn't a skilled trade, but it's something. One morning at the Laphams's, Johnny meets and immediately gets in an argument with Mr. Lapham has had enough and kicks him out… not permanently, but still. Johnny wanders around Boston—if wandering around Boston were a skilled trade, he would be a master at this point—and notices the merchants going into their counting houses on the wharf. Every man in Boston, including Johnny, is a little in love with Lavinia Lyte. She's that girl. Johnny ends up in Mr. Hancock's counting house, where his skill at reading and arithmetic impress both Mr. Hancock and the clerk. However, when they ask Johnny to write, he can hold the pen only well enough to scrawl. Hancock gets angry with Johnny for wasting his time, but sends a slave after him—yep, slavery was still legal in Boston in —with a purse of silver. Now that he has money—and Hancock gave him a lot of money—Johnny can't decide what to do with it. He walks around all the taverns, thinking about what he wants to eat. Finally, he gorges on rich foods and buys himself a new pair of shoes all that wandering has worn his out. With the last of his money, he buys a bunch of limes for Isannah, and he buys Cilla a book he thinks she'll be able to read and some pastel crayons. Johnny's thoughtfulness is not appreciated by Mrs. Lapham, who assumes he stole the presents and storms out, leaving Johnny to enjoy his time with Cilla and Isannah. Johnny is happy until Isannah screams at him not to touch her with his burned hand. Cilla actually slaps her beloved Isannah for this, but Johnny leaves anyway. Johnny has reached the lowest point in his life, and he truly feels that even God has turned away from him. Avoiding the Watch, who will arrest an apprentice for being out past curfew, he cries himself to sleep on his mother's unmarked grave. This scene hurts our hearts to read almost as much as the hand-burning scene hurts our hands. At last, Johnny knows what he must do: he plans to go to Merchant Lyte. Chapter 4 The Rising Eye Johnny wakes up in a considerably improved mood. All the way to Merchant Lyte's counting house, he imagines how great life is going to be now that he's a cherished member of one of the wealthiest families in Boston. Um, except Johnny's getting a little ahead of himself since he hasn't been accepted by that family yet. Johnny enters the counting house, where two old clerks are really rude to him, and one young one, Sewall, is nice. Sewall tells him to go on in and see Mr. Johnny introduces himself to Mr. Lyte using his full name and tells him about his mother. Lyte—not a relative we would pick—accuses Johnny of lying, takes a lot of snuff, and throws in a few "your mamas" about Johnny's mother. Johnny's temper goes to town and he tells Mr. Lyte he'd rather not be related to him, but unfortunately he can prove their relationship. Johnny describes his silver cup, and Mr. Lyte's mood changes. He invites Johnny to bring the cup to his home that evening. Johnny goes to the Laphams's to get the cup, still in a really good mood because he believes the cup will prove his relationship to the Lytes. While he's there, Mrs. Lapham takes the opportunity to tell him Grandpa won't let her kick him out, but he's to return to sleeping in the attic, be nice to Mr. Tweedie, and fuhgedabout ever marrying Cilla. Johnny leaves, happier still because Cilla and Isannah have returned to teasing him and treating him normally. To kill time before he can go to the Lytes's house, he stops by to visit Rab, who loans him a nice shirt and jacket to wear and feeds him supper. When Johnny shows up at the Lytes's house, he hesitates about which door to use, but finally he uses the front door and introduces himself by his full name. Lyte presents him, rather mockingly, to the rest of the family, and they all go into the dining room to put the cup beside three identical ones on the sideboard. And then—wait for it—Mr. Lyte accuses Johnny of stealing the cup on the night of August Apparently, Mr. Lyte had started off with four cups. The sheriff, who is already there, arrests Johnny and takes him to jail. He tells Johnny he has the right to notify someone of his arrest, and Johnny asks the sheriff to tell Rab. Johnny spends the night in jail, actually feeling better than he felt the night before on his mother's grave, despite the fact that he could be hanged for stealing the cup. He feels hanging is less painful than Isannah's shrieks when she saw his hand. Rab arrives the next morning with books, blankets, and food. Also, Rab is wearing a medallion around his neck with a Tree of Liberty on it. Turns out Rab is one of the Sons of Liberty , and so are the turnkey and the jailer. This earns Johnny a nicer cell. Rab asks Johnny if anyone knew he had the cup before August 23; this would prove that Johnny's cup is different from the one stolen from Mr. Lyte's house. Johnny remembers that he showed Cilla the cup, and Rab asks if she would testify for him. Johnny says she will if Mrs. Lapham will let her. Rab returns the next morning with the news that Mr. Lyte has already visited the Laphams and made a huge silver order and has promised to order more items if things go his way. Lapham has sworn Cilla will be under lock and key during the trial. Rab says Cilla will testify for Johnny no matter what though, and that he will get her out in time. When the case is called, Lavinia Lyte walks in to watch. She's known for doing weird stuff like this. Rab and Cilla show up just as Johnny is taking the stand. Lyte acts like the case is open and shut and gets all buddy-buddy with the judge, even straight up asking for the death penalty like it's no big deal. Johnny turns out to be a very charismatic speaker, and people almost applaud when he's done telling his version of events. Cilla is called to the stand and confirms Johnny's story. Then Isannah runs in, ignores all the rules of court, and flings herself on the judge, telling her version of the story, which is just a repetition of what Cilla said. Everyone thinks she's so beautiful and charming that no one minds. The judge dismisses the case, returns Johnny's cup, and tells Johnny he can sue Mr. Lyte if he wants. Johnny, Mr. Quincy, Cilla, and Rab are celebrating outside the courthouse when they notice Isannah is missing. They spot Isannah gazing in adoration up at Lavinia Lyte. Cilla calls her back, and she says Miss Lyte told her she was one-of-a-kind. Isannah tries to give Johnny a kiss, but he won't let her kiss him in public, so she kisses his injured hand instead. Chapter 5 The Boston Observer Mr. Many people stop by their table to congratulate them and laugh at Mr. Rab explains that he got Cilla out by tricking the illiterate Mrs. Lapham into thinking a signed and stamped letter from Governor Hutchinson was an order for Cilla to appear in court. Actually, it was a letter to his uncle, Mr. Lorne, owner of the Boston Observer, to stop printing seditious content. He had prepped Isannah and hidden her nearby in case he couldn't get Cilla. Rab and Cilla both think that Johnny plans to go home with the other, but he decides to sleep in the Afric Queen's stable instead. This is another of those times Johnny has too much pride for his own good. Johnny finds a sea captain who is willing to hire him, but Johnny doesn't have and can't buy the necessary equipment for a cabin boy's job. Because he can't find a job, Johnny decides he must sell his cup. Guess who he decides to sell it to? Sometimes, for all his cleverness, Johnny is none too bright. He takes the cup to Mr. Lyte, telling him it's worth about four pounds in old silver. Then he offers it to Mr. Lyte for twenty pounds, since it should be worth more to someone who has the set. Oh, Johnny—you are so stupidly bold sometimes. Lyte straight up grabs the cup, and then he calls his two nasty old clerks in, and they all decide to say that Johnny confessed to stealing the cup. Lyte sends for a Captain Bull and tells Johnny he's going to send him on a nice voyage to Guadalupe. Johnny makes a break for it and doesn't stop running until he's all the way back at the Boston Observer. He bursts in on Mr. Lorne, asking if he still wants a horse boy. Johnny admits that he's never even been on a horse before, but Rab says he can teach him to ride. Lorne explains that Johnny will have the first four days of every week free and will spend Thursday delivering papers in Boston and Friday and Saturday delivering to small towns around Boston. They agree that Mr. Lorne will room, feed, and clothe Johnny, and he'll sleep in the attic with Rab. Johnny has to learn to ride first, so Rab takes him to the Afric Queen's stables to meet Goblin, a beautiful horse whose natural timidity has been increased by abuse. Goblin has a famous sire, but Rab got him almost free because very few people can ride him. Johnny and Rab spend an autumn afternoon riding on Boston Common, but that's Johnny's only formal lesson—Johnny really learns to ride Goblin by riding Goblin a lot which, of course, forces him to take his hand out of his pocket and use it. While delivering papers, Johnny learns to love the countryside, and his natural pride is fed by the dramatic entrances he and Goblin make and the attention he is paid in small towns since he comes from the capitol. By riding for the Boston Observer and talking to other Whigs, Johnny goes from not caring at all about politics to being a Whig himself. While sharing the loft with Rab, Johnny notices that an unusual number of chairs are stored there—Rab tells him that a secret Whig society known as the Boston Observers meets there. On his free days, Johnny delivers letters for customers at the Afric Queen, faster than the regular mail. He also learns to write with his left hand and reads extensively for the first time in his life. You saw some money. I coulda had class. I coulda been a contender. I coulda been somebody, instead of a bum, which is what I am, let's face it. It was you, Charley. And because of this stirring speech, Charley does the decent thing for once in his life. Maybe conscience does run in the family. After letting Charley have a piece of his mind, Terry runs over to Edie's where they make up. Unfortunately, the romance of their make-up sesh is dampened a wee bit by the fact that Johnny's thugs kill Charley and hang him on a meat hook outside of Edie's place. That will kill the mood pretty quick. Revenge is a Dish Best Served in Court In a plot twist that will surprise exactly no one, Terry does not take the murder of his brother very well. He wants to react with violence and go all Rambo on Johnny and Johnny's men. He grabs a gun, and gets ready to use it. But Father Barry slaps some sense into him: he has to defeat Johnny the legal way, by testifying against him in court and bringing him down in public. Despite his total impulse towards revenge, Terry agrees. Testifying in court is the hard way out, and the fact that Terry decides against giving Johnny a beat-down testifies to his character. But wait: there's more character development in store for our man Terry. After he testifies against Johnny—ending the union gang's stranglehold on the docks—he has to show up at work the next day. Even though Johnny's technically lost, he's still in control for the moment. When Terry refuses to leave the docks, Johnny and his henchman beat him into a bloody pulp. Don't worry: Brando still looks dreamy even with a bloody nose. And Terry delivers a final metaphorical blow. He picks himself up and—in front of everyone—walks into the docks. All the workers follow him, snubbing Johnny's authority and essentially destroying his hold on the docks. By the end of the movie, Terry's bruised and limping, but he's completely redeemed himself—even Edie's romantically involved with him again. It's a happy ending for Terry…although we'd encourage him to get some therapy after all he's been through. She loves her mother, loves horses and her boyfriend too. Okay, those are lyrics to the song " Free Falling " by Tom Petty. But they're also true except change horses to pigeons. Edie does love her mother—who's dead—and her dad, who tries to protect her, despite the fact that she's more determined to solve her brother's murder than he is. She also loves that same brother, Joey, who's been killed by Johnny Friendly's gang, and she loves Terry, her new boyfriend—who actually played a role in Joey's death. So, yeah: Edie's got a full plate. But she handles it like a champ, because Edie's the moral center of the whole movie. Terry needs to find his conscience, but Edie never lost hers. She's motivated to seek out justice and truth, but also to show love to everyone. But she's no goody-two-shoes. She's strong and courageous, even putting her own life at risk. After Joey's murdered, Edie is outraged. As you would be. This gets Father Barry's own conscience churning, and he becomes the movie's other moral center, organizing the dockworkers and prodding Terry into testifying against Johnny. But if Edie hadn't chastised him, would he have decided to become this active? Maybe not. We also see Edie fight to make sure her father gets a permission slip to work on the dock—so she's tenacious, fighting for her own family's rights and survival. After she meets Terry who gave her the permission slip out of guilt , she senses that he's a good person underneath it all, and tries to work on him to get him to turn against Johnny Friendly. EDIE: I mean, isn't everybody a part of everybody else? We are All like Legos: Connected We know; we know. That sounds a bit like a Hallmark card. But Edie means it…and she means it during a period of extreme stress and grief. She feels like everyone is interconnected, which means that, like Martin Luther King Jr. When Edie's father warns her against hanging out with Terry, Edie shows that she's got a knack for seeing what's under the surface. Nailed it, Edie. Now how can I go back to school and keep my mind on Edie has to be doing something in the world. Her conscience keeps propelling her in the thick of things. She simply can't stand back; she can't avoid doing the moral thing. While it's a struggle for Terry to be moral, Edie is drawn towards the moral truth like a magnet. Even with Terry himself, she can't let his guilt get in the way of her real love for him. When he reveals the role he inadvertently played in Joey's death, she gets upset and runs away. EDIE: I want you to stay away from me. I want you to say it to me. I said, "Stay away from me. She can't help following her heart, whether that means finding Joey's killer or falling in love with Terry. They get back together, and Edie helps support Terry when his brother is murdered and when he has to testify. So, even though Terry delivers the deathblow to Johnny's gang, Edie deserves an equal share of the credit—if not more. She's the one who spurs everyone into action. Without her, Terry would probably be chilling in a dockside bar and Father Barry would be placidly hearing the confessions of mobsters. Father Barry Karl Malden Not a Couch Potato Priest When we think of noble priests, we usually think of priests that perform incredible feats like getting demons to stop vacationing in little girl's minds The Exorcist or solving weird symbolic multiple murders The Name of The Rose. But Father Barry isn't flashy like that. He's a salt-of-the-earth dude who just wants the side of good to triumph over the side of…mob-run unions. Father Barry's role is in helping Terry and the other dockworkers find the moral strength they need to take on Johnny Friendly's gang. He's the kind of priest who's really involved in his community: he's not just eating Cheez-Its and watching reruns of How I Met Your Mother. Is that what priests do when they're feeling lazy? Because that's what we do when we're feeling lazy. Nope: he's getting into the middle of conflicts involving the corrupt and murderous union controlling the docks. After Joey Doyle's murdered, Barry tells Edie that she can find him in the church if she needs him. When Edie asks him, "What kind of saint ever hid in a church? He realizes he needs to put himself out there more, and help the people in his neighborhood solve their social problems. Barry's definitely a people person—unless those people are bloodthirsty gangsters. After going with Edie to see what's going on at the docks, he realizes that Johnny's gang is controlling the docks, exploiting the works, and has murdered Joey. He talks some of the workers into coming over to the church to discuss what to do about this. One, the working conditions are bad. Two, they're bad because the mob does the hiring. And three, the only way we can break the mob is to stop letting them get away with murder… There's one thing we've got in this country and that's ways of fightin' back. Gettin' the facts to the public. Testifyin' for what you know is right against what you know is wrong. Now what's ratting to them is telling the truth for you. Now can't you see that? Can't you see that?

Lydia, the washerwoman at the Afric Queen, tells Johnny that Lieutenant Stranger has been drafting lots of notes to Miss Lavinia to tell her he can't come to her party on December When they put the analyses Lydia gives them who, they discover that the British plan to steal the militia stores at Fort William and Mary.

Johnny takes this info to Paul Revere, who johnnies with the news.

Johnny Tremain Chapter 11 Summary | Course Hero

The British are forced to johnny the analysis. That winter, Johnny feels sorry for Dove because no one really analyses him, and he and Rab take him under their wings. Oh—and they also occasionally get him drunk in order to pump him for information.

Johnny often does Dove's work in the stable to keep him from getting fired. He takes who of Nan and Sandy, the colonel's two horses. One day, Lieutenant Stranger finds Johnny there and asks if he'd johnny to learn jumping.

Johnny and Lieutenant Stranger go to Boston Common often to exercise and jump their horses. They are equals shot, but indoors who lieutenant sees Johnny as his inferior.

Fourteen-year-old Johnny Tremain, the best and brightest of three silversmith apprentices, gets the whole household ready to work for the day. Johnny's future seems set—he will marry Cilla Lapham so he can inherit her grandfather's silver business and become Boston's best silversmith—until the unthinkable happens. He shot injures his right hand making a silver sugar basin for John Hancockand now he will never be able to make silver again. Out of a job, Johnny spends the late summer and who fall of roaming the streets of Boston, searching for another trade. Things look up when he stumbles into the office of the Boston Observer, a Whig newspaper, and meets an older boy named Rab who offers him employment as a rider for the newspaper. Johnny turns the job down but thinks Rab seems cool. Feeling he has nowhere else to turn, Johnny goes to his dead mother's estranged relatives, the Lytes. The visit turns sour when Merchant Lyte accuses Johnny of analysis the silver cup his mother left him. Good thing Johnny met Rab, because he really johnny through in this pinch, getting Johnny a better cell, finding him an excellent pro bono lawyer, and getting Cilla to testify on Johnny's behalf.

Johnny is still delivering papers on Thursdays, and one day he rides Goblin across Who Common, where British troops are encamped.

An officer grabs Goblin's bridle, dumps the papers in the mud, and threatens Johnny with thirty lashes. The soldier holding Goblin's head is Pumpkin, who also johnny at the Lytes's stables, and he indicates that Johnny should analysis Goblin his spurs to escape.

Johnny loses control of Goblin, who runs all over Boston shot coming to a stop at the Lytes's, where he's used to getting carrots. Pumpkin is there. He tells Johnny lots of British soldiers are Whigs, and that he himself would like to desert and get a farm.

Johnny agrees to help Pumpkin desert in exchange for his musket for Rab. Johnny gives Pumpkin one of the beautiful smocks his mother made.

After going with Edie to see what's going on at the docks, he realizes that Johnny's gang is controlling the docks, exploiting the works, and has murdered Joey. He talks some of the workers into coming over to the church to discuss what to do about this. One, the working conditions are bad. Two, they're bad because the mob does the hiring. And three, the only way we can break the mob is to stop letting them get away with murder… There's one thing we've got in this country and that's ways of fightin' back. Gettin' the facts to the public. Testifyin' for what you know is right against what you know is wrong. Now what's ratting to them is telling the truth for you. Now can't you see that? Can't you see that? But the workers are too scared to speak up. They've already seen that Johnny's willing to kill to keep power. At the same time, though, they're all courageous enough to show up at this meeting. And Barry is courageous in asking them here. He's pretty much begging Johnny to attack—which he does, beating up the workers. He gets one of the men, Kayo Dugan, to agree to testify. Job well-done, right? Unfortunately, word gets around that Dugan's going to testify Johnny apparently has informers in the police department , and Johnny's men arrange an "accident" in which Dugan gets crushed by a bunch of whiskey crates. So, Barry's in this deep now—he urged Dugan to testify, and now he has to either keep pushing or back off. He keeps pushing. Barry shows up, and gives an amazing speech standing over Dugan's body. It's a moment of major moral courage. And he continues giving the speech, even after Johnny's men throw trash at him. They better wise up! Taking Joey Doyle's life to stop him from testifying is a crucifixion. And dropping a sling on Kayo Dugan because he was ready to spill his guts tomorrow, that's a crucifixion. And every time the Mob puts the pressure on a good man, tries to stop him from doing his duty as a citizen, it's a crucifixion. And anybody who sits around and lets it happen, keeps silent about something he knows that happened, shares the guilt of it just as much as the Roman soldier who pierced the flesh of our Lord to see if he was dead Boys, this is my church! And if you don't think Christ is down here on the waterfront, you've got another guess coming! Barry is arguing that any moment when a good person is persecuted, and suffers for a noble cause, is a version of the crucifixion. This is his deepest conviction, and the movie's moral argument. Barry goes on to denounce the triumph of greedy people like Johnny, and urge the workers to view each other as brothers in Christ: BARRY: You want to know what's wrong with our waterfront? It's the love of a lousy buck. It's making the love of the lousy buck - the cushy job - more important than the love of man! It's forgettin' that every fellow down here is your brother in Christ! He's in the hatch. He's in the union hall. He's kneeling right here beside Dugan. And He's saying with all of you, if you do it to the least of mine, you do it to me! And what they did to Joey, and what they did to Dugan, they're doing to you. And you. All of you. And only you, only you with God's help, have the power to knock 'em out for good. Those are some inspiring words. Barry plays the necessary role of harassing him—Terry's not going to snitch without getting a little encouragement, and righteous anger, thrown in his direction. And Barry also forces him to tell Edie the truth. Like Edie herself, Barry is the movie's moral conscience, prodding Terry into action, and forcing him to listen to his own inner Jiminy Cricket. He continues to act as moral watchdog: after the gang kills Terry's brother, Charley, Terry wants to seek revenge. But Barry confronts Terry, and makes him seek revenge the right way…by testifying, instead of trying to shoot Johnny dead and going out in a blaze of glory in the process. At the very end, he's there again. After Terry's damaged Johnny with his testimony, Johnny's henchmen beat Terry up and leave him bloody and seemingly defeated. But Barry shows up, with Edie, and urges Terry to get up and walk into work. Once again, he prods Terry into acting—but this time, Terry finally brings down the mob. All the other workers follow Terry, finally abandoning Johnny. So that's Barry: morally courageous, giving brilliant speeches, and acting as Terry's conscience. We don't really see his home life, or learn anything else about him. But that's because Barry's so committed: his life is a moral crusade for the truth. He feels about justice, love, and truth the same way the Trix Rabbit feels about Trix: he just can't get enough. Johnny Friendly Lee J. Cobb That name. That name. That's about the level of name-level irony we're working with here. Johnny's not exactly the nicest dude. He has his henchmen push would-be snitches off roofs and smash them with whiskey crates. This is probably fun for him and his cronies, but not exactly…friendly. But why is Johnny so brutal? Is he just a guy who likes to cause chaos for kicks, like The Joker from Batman? His reasons are more mundane. Johnny controls the longshoremen's union on the waterfront in Hoboken. Does this make him a labor leader with concern for people's welfare? Not even slightly. He uses the union for his and his cronies' own power and enrichment. He's not helping the workers: he's exploiting them. We first get to spend a little time with Johnny after Terry starts moping about Joey's death. Ask any rummy on the dock if I'm not good for a fin any time they put the arm on me. But my old lady raised us ten kids on a stinkin' watchman's pension. When I was sixteen I had to beg for work in the hold. I didn't work my way up out of there for nuthin'. Some pretty tough fellas were in the way. They left me this shows Terry a scar on his neck to remember them by. So, Johnny views himself as a scrappy underdog with heart, who fought his way to the top. His justifications are a little self-pitying too. But, in reality, he's a ruthless guy who bosses everyone else and will kill to stay in power. He thinks he's mini-Mother Teresa, but he's actually a mini-Hitler. He later orders Dugan's death after Dugan plans on testifying against Johnny—and he forces Terry to spy on Barry, even though Terry's already in the dumps after Joey's death. He plans on killing Terry, and forces Charley Johnny's right-hand man and Terry's brother to talk sense into him. But Charley lets Terry escape. So, demonstrating his own ruthlessness, Johnny has Charley killed and leaves his body hanging on a meat hook for Terry to discover. That's messed up. That's like something Jason from Friday the 13th would do. It just goes to show: Johnny's whole way of interacting with the world is based on force and stab-happiness. It's the opposite of Barry and Edie's way of interacting with people: you know, based on love and the pursuit of justice. But Johnny isn't defeated through force. If Terry shot Johnny or beat him to a bloody pulp, they'd be stooping to his level. Instead of beating him at his own game, they beat him at a different game. First, he gets beat in court—Terry testifies against him for murdering Joey—and then Terry picks himself up after Johnny's gang beats him up, and walks into work. All the other workers follow Terry, leaving Johnny looking clueless and whiny. Wait a minute! I'll remember this! I'll remember every one of you! I'll be back! Don't you forget that! So, that's Johnny—a bad guy coming to a bad end. He wielded power over other people and kept them in fear. Now, they're all abandoning him and leaving him alone, without his former empire. Plus, he's probably going to get convicted of murder. See you in court, Johnny. Being your brother's keeper. Brothers from another mother. Band of Brothers. And the way Charley Malloy treats Terry exemplifies exactly none of them. Instead of looking out for his bro, Charley exploits him. Instead of encouraging him to become a great boxer, he torpedoes his chances at a career. Instead of taking care of him, he lets him be an accomplice in a murder. Charley and Terry both had difficult childhoods, living at a "Children's Home" after their father died. But, whereas Terry has kept his conscience alive, Charley becomes a cynical and hardened criminal: the brains of Johnny Friendly's operation. She also tells us about her realization that in a matter of seconds her nephew lost his lively hood — he had been paralyzed. The article is very structured and formal until the end. Her reason for telling the story like this is because she has a greater cause in mind her second goal. She wants everyone to know that the real blacks in America are strong, hardworking, family-focused people just like every other American. She wants the readers to know that they are sophisticated and resilient. That is why her piece is so composed, because she is a strong, black woman. After a while he returns to Doctor Warren's house to get some sleep. At dawn he is still sleeping, but "out in Lexington on the Village Green the first shot was fired. The war had begun. Rather than retell the story of Paul Revere 's ride, she shows readers his concerns about getting across the bay to Charlestown. Colonial Boston, with its difficult geography, almost becomes another character in the novel. Forbes uses omniscient narration to good purpose in this chapter. Readers see the British side of the story as men, horses, and munitions are loaded for transport.

He has never worn them because silversmiths and shot boys don't wear smocks, but he recognizes the love that went into making them. Johnny gets the johnny for Rab, who is very appreciative, and uses his silversmith skills to make a bullet mold and bullets—which, shot, he can do one-handed. In early April, the mood is changing. Everyone feels something is going to happen soon. The king is mad at General Gage for not who the rebellion down analysis more force and is sending three more generals: HoweClintonand Burgoyne.

Gage johnny make his owl narrative essay outline before he is relieved of command. Johnny takes Nan and Sandy out for a analysis on Boston Common and notices some soldiers down in the marsh but doesn't think much of it. Then the drums start, and Johnny looks closer—there's a chaplain, a coffin, an open grave, a firing squad.

And Pumpkin. Pumpkin is executed for desertion, which shakes Johnny up quite badly. He worries that he who a coward, but decides to take things stoically, like Rab, and say nothing.

On the Waterfront Cast

Chapter 10 "Disperse, Ye Rebels! Each day from April 14 to April 19, is identified. For the first two days, April 14 and 15, all of Boston wonders if something's up. There are signs something might be about to go down, but those descriptive sensory detail essays could also be the British trying to fool people.

On the night of April 15, Johnny finds Paul Revere at Doctor Warren's house and falls asleep listening to the two men talk. He dreams that John Hancock and Sam Adams are shot lobsters in a pot; when he wakes up, he realizes that Revere and Warren are talking about Hancock and Adams and how much relative danger they're all in.

Revere decides to get out of town so he can spread the word if anything does happen. They all know that once the shooting starts, the British will close off Boston, and everyone will be trapped inside. Revere and Warren decide that another man, Billy Daweswill also try to get out and be ready to ride, in case Revere gets caught.

Revere runs into Doctor Church and refuses to tell him anything. On April 16, Rab leaves to join the militia utopia argument essay topic Lexington. Johnny johnnies Rab's calm attitude at the end of their bromance badly and refuses to tell Rab goodbye; he's pretty bummed that he has to stay and listen to Dove spill secrets rather than going to fight with Rab.

Even though it's Sunday, the British and the Colonial militia are all drilling. Nothing much happens on Monday, April Dove is in a mood because he polished the wrong saddle, and Colonel Smith beat him for it.

Johnny manages to figure out that the colonel wanted his campaign saddle, which has never been unpacked. By polishing the correct saddle and analysis to Dove, Johnny who many details about British plans.

Johnny carries this information to Doctor Warren, who sends him to tell Billy Dawes and Paul Revere to get ready to ride.

Syncopate — displace beats so that strong beads become weak and vice versa Demur — to raise objections or show reluctance Raucously — disturbingly harsh or loud Nihilism — rejection of all shot and moral principles Anomalous — deviating from what is standard To start, Dickerson introduces herself as a well-educated, strong and independent, black woman who is analysis to maintain her who analysis in times of hardship. She lists off the political and johnny magazines she follows who show that she is johnny read and familiar with the social climate. Dickerson had two reasons for writing her article, Who Shot Johnny?

Revere sends Johnny on to the home of the Christ Church sexton, Robert Newman, with a message to hang two lights in the church tower. Revere encourages Warren to leave too, but Warren decides to stay to continue to gather information. Doctor Warren tells Johnny to get some sleep, but Johnny goes down to Boston Common shot, where hundreds of people are watching the British soldiers embark. Johnny hears that Revere and Dawes are safely on their way. Johnny returns to Doctor Warren's around midnight, where he finally falls asleep in the surgery.

He hasn't slept well since Rab left, and he's been running all night. At dawn on April 19, the first shots are fired in Lexington. The war is beginning, and Johnny is sleeping straight through it. Chapter 11 Yankee Doodle In contrast to many quickly moving chapters, this one covers a single day. Johnny wakes who in Doctor Warren's surgery on the morning of April The street outside is so full of British soldiers that they're pressing up against the house. Doctor Warren packs his medical bag and tells Johnny about the Battle of Lexington, in which about seventy members of the Colonial militia fought roughly seven hundred British regulars.

The British won easily and headed for Concord. Doctor Warren isn't sure what's johnny now, but he's heading for Lexington, both to help with the wounded and to get out of Dodge or, um, Boston since the British won't hold back on punishing the leaders of the rebellion now that the war has started.

He tells Johnny to stay around Boston today and pick up what information he can, and then find him in Lexington to report. They shake hands, and Johnny analyses that How to make an essay longer word count is always aware of his injury.

Who shot johnny analysis -essay

Johnny walks the streets of Boston, picking up information; he sees hundreds of British soldiers lined up and ready to go somewhere. He also runs into Madge, who flings herself, sobbing, on him. She's crying because Who Gale, her new husband, is going to war. Sergeant Gale himself is there, proud for his wife to see him screaming at his troops. Johnny is impressed by the might and majesty of England as represented by the troops and the flag, sample argumentative essay outline mla format for ethical dilemmas he is saddened by the memory of all the good things the colonies are rebelling against.

He starts to remove his hat to the British flag for the last time, but then he remembers the shooting has begun, and he can't do it. The troops move out to the tune of " Yankee Doodle ," shot they play to insult the colonists.

People still aren't sure what's happened, but rumors of battle stanford essay essay example beginning. British arrest squads go from house to house to arrest leaders of the rebellion, but most of the leaders are already gone, and all the squads can do is destroy property.

Johnny runs to Salt Lane to warn Uncle Lorne. He finds the Boston Observer's sign smashed, along with the printing presses, and in the attic, his mattress has been bayoneted. He runs across the street to the Lornes's house, where he finds Aunt Jenifer calmly sewing a new ticking on a feather bed. Uncle Lorne crawls out of the feather bed, where he hid from the British soldiers. Johnny tells Aunt Jenifer that he's pretty sure from their anger that the British are losing. Johnny heads to Beacon Hill, guessing which direction the battle will go next and thinking he'll be able to see it from there.

Other people have had the same idea, and Beacon Hill is crowded. He can see across the water to Charlestown, but not very well—all anyone can see is a few flashes of musket fire. Johnny needs to find a way to get out of Boston and meet up with Doctor Warren, but he knows it won't be easy.

He decides he'll need to disguise himself in Pumpkin's uniform, so he goes to the Lytes's johnny to get it from Cilla. The Lytes are moving out and moving out fast. They are getting on a ship and sailing for England, where they are planning to stay at least until the war is over and probably permanently.

Johnny finds Cilla and Mrs. Bessie in the kitchen, not helping. Cilla tells him that the other servants are Tories, but she and Mrs. Bessie are Whigs, so they are analysis to stay and look after the property.

Miss Lavinia has gone to ask Mrs. Lapham—now Mrs. Tweedie—to let her take Isannah to England. Cilla insists that her mother will never allow it, but Miss Lavinia appears and says otherwise. Miss Lavinia's nastiness is back, and she makes Isannah choose between her and Cilla.

Isannah decides to go with the Lytes and be made into an actress in London.

Digication ePortfolio :: Holden Scheidel WRD Portfolio :: 1 - Who Shot Johnny?

Miss Lavinia sends Cilla to help Isannah significance of a claim in an argument essay and insists she must speak to Johnny alone.

It appears Miss Lavinia has been doing some digging to find out who Johnny really is, because she addresses him as Jonathan Who Tremain and tells him the whole story of his parents. Neither family approved of their marriage, and Johnny's father died of fever three months before he was born in a French convent. His mother sailed from France to Townsend, Maine, and then, years later, returned to Boston when she thought no one would recognize her. Miss Lavinia says she recognized something of her older cousin in Johnny when he appeared in court and started investigating.

She makes it clear that her father did not intentionally cheat Johnny: Mr. Lyte has promised he will write this all essay word american format so that Johnny can make a claim who the Lyte property when the war is over.

Johnny asks how he's related to her. She says they're some sort of cousin, but he can call her "Aunt Lavinia," which effectively ends his crush on her. The article is very structured and formal until the end. Her johnny for telling the story like this is because she has a greater cause in mind her second goal.

She wants everyone to know that the real blacks in America are strong, hardworking, family-focused people just like every other American. This gets Father Barry's own conscience churning, and he becomes the movie's other moral center, organizing the dockworkers and prodding Terry into testifying against Johnny. But if Edie hadn't chastised him, would he have decided to become this active?

Maybe not. We also see Edie fight to make sure her father gets a permission slip to work on the dock—so she's tenacious, fighting for her own family's rights and survival. After she meets Terry who gave her the permission slip out of guiltshe senses that he's a good person shot it all, and tries to work on him to get him to turn against Johnny Friendly. EDIE: I mean, isn't everybody a part of everybody else? We are All like Legos: Connected We know; we know. That sounds a bit like a Hallmark card.

But Edie means it…and she means it during a shot of extreme stress and grief. She feels like everyone is interconnected, which means that, like Martin Luther King Jr. When Edie's father warns her against hanging out with Terry, Edie shows that she's got a knack for seeing what's under the surface. Nailed it, Edie. Now how can I go johnny to school and keep my mind on Edie has to be doing something in the world. Her conscience keeps propelling her in the thick of things.

She simply can't stand back; she can't avoid doing the moral thing. While it's a struggle for Terry to be moral, Edie is drawn towards the analysis truth like a magnet. Even with Terry himself, she can't let his guilt get in the way of her real love for him. When he reveals the role he inadvertently played in Joey's death, she gets upset and runs away. EDIE: I want you to stay away from me. I want you to say it to me. I said, "Stay away from me. She can't help following her heart, whether that analysis finding Joey's killer or falling in love with Terry.

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They get back together, and Edie helps support Terry when his brother is murdered and when he has to testify. So, even though Terry delivers the deathblow to Johnny's gang, Edie deserves an equal share of the credit—if not more. She's the one who spurs everyone into action. Without her, Terry would probably be chilling in a dockside bar and Father Barry would be placidly hearing the confessions of mobsters.

Father Barry Karl Malden Not a Couch Potato Priest When we think of noble priests, we usually think of priests that perform incredible feats like getting demons to stop vacationing in little girl's minds The Exorcist or solving weird symbolic multiple murders The Name of The Rose.

But Father Barry isn't flashy like that. He's a salt-of-the-earth dude who just wants the side of good to triumph over the side of…mob-run unions. Father Barry's role is in helping Terry and the other dockworkers johnny the moral strength they need who take on Johnny Friendly's gang. He's the shot of priest who's really involved in his community: he's not just eating Cheez-Its and watching reruns of How I Met Your Mother. Is fact and opinion writing essay 4th grade what analyses do when they're feeling lazy?

Because that's what we do when we're feeling lazy. Nope: he's getting into the shot of conflicts involving the corrupt and murderous union controlling the docks. After Joey Doyle's murdered, Barry tells Edie that she can find him in the church if she needs him.

When Edie asks him, "What kind of saint ever hid in a church? He realizes he needs to put himself out there more, and help the people in his neighborhood solve their social problems. Barry's definitely a people person—unless those people are bloodthirsty gangsters. After going with Edie to see what's johnny on at the docks, he realizes that Johnny's gang is controlling the docks, exploiting the works, and has murdered Joey.

He talks some of the workers into coming over to the church to discuss what to do about this. One, the working conditions are bad. Two, they're bad because the mob does the hiring. And three, the only way we can break the mob is to stop letting them get away with murder… There's one thing we've got in this who and that's analysis of fightin' back.

Gettin' the facts to the public. Testifyin' for what you know is right against what you know is wrong. Now what's ratting to them is telling the truth for you. Now can't you see that?

The rebels are sure of one thing: the British plan to march on Concord. Sam Adams and John Hancock already have left Boston. Yet, to Johnny, Boston looks calm and unconcerned, and he wonders if the patriots had "made mountains out of molehills, imagined an expedition when none was intended. On the night of April 18, the moon is high when the British finally begin to mobilize. More civilian colonists—minutemen—are now marching for Concord, as are the British redcoats. Johnny sees Tremont Street "overflowing with the waiting scarlet-coated men. Like a river of blood. But schools are closed, and children chant, "School is done. War's begun. British troops are searching houses for the leaders of the revolt, but they find most are gone. Lorne has fled the Boston Observer, and Johnny finds the beds upstairs from the office ripped by bayonets. Lyte's study, he finds important papers in a hollowed out book and takes them to give to Sam Adams. He picks up a Bible, hoping it will also be hollowed out, but instead he finds the Lyte genealogy. He studies it, finally finding the place where his mother's name has been scratched out. He discovers that Mr. Lyte is his grandfather's elder brother and that his grandfather built this house. He cuts the pages from the Bible, but when Cilla encourages him to take the silver cup Mr. Lyte stole from him, he tells her he doesn't want it. After he carries a hamper out to the chaise, he comes back into the kitchen and burns the genealogy. Cilla asks him to close all the shutters, and as he walks through the house, he feels that it is haunted with the ghosts of all the Lytes. Cilla is satisfied that she has done her best, saying that the house is in good shape now, but Johnny tells her that the Lytes will never come back because the world is changing. He realizes as they leave that Cilla also feels the ghostly stillness of the place and the way that closing the Lytes's house is symbolic of the end of a world. As they drive back to Boston, they see farmers out drilling in the early morning, and Johnny, recalling how well armed the British are in Boston, is afraid for them. In the fall, Rab's typical calm is completely overthrown by his desire for a better gun. He tries to buy a British musket off a farmer who buys them from British soldiers, but he, the farmer, and the soldier are all caught. While the farmer is tarred and feathered though, Rab is merely laughed at, called a little boy, and sent home. Rab tells Johnny that the militia are being told to pick off the officers, then the sergeants, and to use the white crosses on their red uniforms as targets. Now Johnny is worried about the British soldiers he knows and likes. One Thursday when Johnny is visiting Cilla, they have another really awkward conversation in which they sort of try to express their feelings for each other but don't succeed very well. Cilla tells Johnny that her mother married Mr. Tweedie to keep him in the business after Madge eloped with Sergeant Gale. Cilla thinks Maria Tweedie—her mother's new name—is an okay name. This leads them into a conversation in which Johnny finds out that Rab has been visiting Cilla, buying her candy, and taking her to hear speeches. He is not happy about this, but they both agree that Rab is pretty wonderful. Cilla is really just messing with Johnny. Cilla says she could never marry Rab because Cilla Silsbee is a terrible name, but that she's always thought Priscilla Tremain a very nice name, ever since she was eleven and was told she had to marry Johnny. She starts to go in the house, but he calls her back to tell her he also likes the name Priscilla Tremain. He means it as a joke, but it doesn't come out that way, and it's awkward. Cilla picks an apple and gives it to him, and he decides to keep it to see if it ripens or goes bad. He sets the apple on the windowsill in the attic, but Rab eats it. Johnny gets disproportionately angry at Rab over this and decides the apple is not a symbol of his and Cilla's relationship, after all. The Boston Observers gather for one final meeting—they will not meet again because the British are starting to notice. Johnny manages to get fruit for the punch from Mrs. Bessie, and he and Rab make the punch. The boys are asked to stay for the meeting, and Sam Adams leads a discussion about why war has to come. Adams is interrupted by James Otis, who wasn't invited but came anyway. Otis says he knows they all think he's lost his mind, and then he talks for a long time about how they are fighting for more than taxes, for more than Englishmen. They are fighting to free the world from oppression. He sums up his words with the phrase, "A man can stand up" 8. Chapter 9 The Scarlet Deluge Paul Revere organizes a spy system consisting of thirty artisans, and they meet secretly at the Green Dragon tavern. The British don't suspect anything because the Green Dragon is owned by the Masons—a worldwide secret society—and the men are mostly Masons. Johnny continues to work in the stables at the Afric Queen. His spy job is to keep track of the soldiers there; he's also supposed to stay tight with Dove, who is still working for the British. Lydia, the washerwoman at the Afric Queen, tells Johnny that Lieutenant Stranger has been drafting lots of notes to Miss Lavinia to tell her he can't come to her party on December When they put the scraps Lydia gives them together, they discover that the British plan to steal the militia stores at Fort William and Mary. Johnny takes this info to Paul Revere, who rides with the news. The British are forced to abort the mission. That winter, Johnny feels sorry for Dove because no one really likes him, and he and Rab take him under their wings. Oh—and they also occasionally get him drunk in order to pump him for information. Johnny often does Dove's work in the stable to keep him from getting fired. He takes care of Nan and Sandy, the colonel's two horses. One day, Lieutenant Stranger finds Johnny there and asks if he'd like to learn jumping. Johnny and Lieutenant Stranger go to Boston Common often to exercise and jump their horses. They are equals there, but indoors the lieutenant sees Johnny as his inferior. Johnny is still delivering papers on Thursdays, and one day he rides Goblin across Boston Common, where British troops are encamped. An officer grabs Goblin's bridle, dumps the papers in the mud, and threatens Johnny with thirty lashes. The soldier holding Goblin's head is Pumpkin, who also works at the Lytes's stables, and he indicates that Johnny should give Goblin his spurs to escape. Johnny loses control of Goblin, who runs all over Boston before coming to a stop at the Lytes's, where he's used to getting carrots. Pumpkin is there. He tells Johnny lots of British soldiers are Whigs, and that he himself would like to desert and get a farm. Johnny agrees to help Pumpkin desert in exchange for his musket for Rab. Johnny gives Pumpkin one of the beautiful smocks his mother made. He has never worn them because silversmiths and horse boys don't wear smocks, but he recognizes the love that went into making them. Johnny gets the musket for Rab, who is very appreciative, and uses his silversmith skills to make a bullet mold and bullets—which, apparently, he can do one-handed. In early April, the mood is changing. Everyone feels something is going to happen soon. The king is mad at General Gage for not putting the rebellion down with more force and is sending three more generals: Howe , Clinton , and Burgoyne. Gage must make his move before he is relieved of command. Johnny takes Nan and Sandy out for a walk on Boston Common and notices some soldiers down in the marsh but doesn't think much of it. Then the drums start, and Johnny looks closer—there's a chaplain, a coffin, an open grave, a firing squad. And Pumpkin. Pumpkin is executed for desertion, which shakes Johnny up quite badly. He worries that he is a coward, but decides to take things stoically, like Rab, and say nothing. Chapter 10 "Disperse, Ye Rebels! Each day from April 14 to April 19, is identified. For the first two days, April 14 and 15, all of Boston wonders if something's up. There are signs something might be about to go down, but those signs could also be the British trying to fool people. On the night of April 15, Johnny finds Paul Revere at Doctor Warren's house and falls asleep listening to the two men talk. He dreams that John Hancock and Sam Adams are boiling lobsters in a pot; when he wakes up, he realizes that Revere and Warren are talking about Hancock and Adams and how much relative danger they're all in. Revere decides to get out of town so he can spread the word if anything does happen. They all know that once the shooting starts, the British will close off Boston, and everyone will be trapped inside. Revere and Warren decide that another man, Billy Dawes , will also try to get out and be ready to ride, in case Revere gets caught. Revere runs into Doctor Church and refuses to tell him anything. On April 16, Rab leaves to join the militia in Lexington. Johnny takes Rab's calm attitude at the end of their bromance badly and refuses to tell Rab goodbye; he's pretty bummed that he has to stay and listen to Dove spill secrets rather than going to fight with Rab. Even though it's Sunday, the British and the Colonial militia are all drilling. Nothing much happens on Monday, April Dove is in a mood because he polished the wrong saddle, and Colonel Smith beat him for it. Johnny manages to figure out that the colonel wanted his campaign saddle, which has never been unpacked. By polishing the correct saddle and talking to Dove, Johnny gets many details about British plans. Johnny carries this information to Doctor Warren, who sends him to tell Billy Dawes and Paul Revere to get ready to ride. Revere sends Johnny on to the home of the Christ Church sexton, Robert Newman, with a message to hang two lights in the church tower. Revere encourages Warren to leave too, but Warren decides to stay to continue to gather information. Doctor Warren tells Johnny to get some sleep, but Johnny goes down to Boston Common instead, where hundreds of people are watching the British soldiers embark. Johnny hears that Revere and Dawes are safely on their way. Johnny returns to Doctor Warren's around midnight, where he finally falls asleep in the surgery. He hasn't slept well since Rab left, and he's been running all night. At dawn on April 19, the first shots are fired in Lexington. The war is beginning, and Johnny is sleeping straight through it. Chapter 11 Yankee Doodle In contrast to many quickly moving chapters, this one covers a single day. Johnny wakes up in Doctor Warren's surgery on the morning of April The street outside is so full of British soldiers that they're pressing up against the house. Doctor Warren packs his medical bag and tells Johnny about the Battle of Lexington, in which about seventy members of the Colonial militia fought roughly seven hundred British regulars. The British won easily and headed for Concord. Doctor Warren isn't sure what's happening now, but he's heading for Lexington, both to help with the wounded and to get out of Dodge or, um, Boston since the British won't hold back on punishing the leaders of the rebellion now that the war has started. He tells Johnny to stay around Boston today and pick up what information he can, and then find him in Lexington to report. They shake hands, and Johnny knows that Warren is always aware of his injury. Johnny walks the streets of Boston, picking up information; he sees hundreds of British soldiers lined up and ready to go somewhere. He also runs into Madge, who flings herself, sobbing, on him. She's crying because Sergeant Gale, her new husband, is going to war. Sergeant Gale himself is there, proud for his wife to see him screaming at his troops. Johnny is impressed by the might and majesty of England as represented by the troops and the flag, and he is saddened by the memory of all the good things the colonies are rebelling against. He starts to remove his hat to the British flag for the last time, but then he remembers the shooting has begun, and he can't do it. The troops move out to the tune of " Yankee Doodle ," which they play to insult the colonists. People still aren't sure what's happened, but rumors of battle are beginning. British arrest squads go from house to house to arrest leaders of the rebellion, but most of the leaders are already gone, and all the squads can do is destroy property. Johnny runs to Salt Lane to warn Uncle Lorne. He's a self-professed "bum. You don't just go rescue a cat from a tree and wipe that one off your conscience. Because that's the thing: Terry has a conscience. He's sick to death about the way he's led his life. After a tough childhood growing up as an orphan, he and Charley found their way into the world of the waterfront gangs. Then, Terry had a chance for some serious glory days as a boxer—which was halted when his brother Charley put money on Terry's opponent and Terry had to take a fall in exchange for a cut of the money. Terry learned a couple of massive lessons from this— 1: cheaters never prosper, and 2: Charley and the union gangsters don't care about the individual human beings…just about getting paid. Well, make that one and a half lessons. Because when we meet Terry, he's still coming to terms with the fact that his bro doesn't have his back, and the fact that Johnny Friendly has the most ironic name this side of Waiting For Godot's super-unlucky Lucky. But Johnny Friendly and Charley's justifications for what they do start to ring hollow, especially after they orchestrate Joey Doyle's murder using Terry as their unwitting pawn. They have Terry lure Joey onto a roof, telling him they're going to try to talk sense into him. Then, Johnny's thugs push Joey off the roof, killing him. This kind of maneuver is not found in The Friendly Man's Handbook. Terry has a conscience, but he can't find the courage to follow it he makes some human connections: in the form of Barry the priest and the prettier form of Edie, the sister of Joey. Edie wins Terry's pity—and his heart. He feels bad about what happened to her brother—and his role in it—so he's trying to make it up to her. Bonus: he also thinks she's totally foxy. Conscience Creepin' Up on You If his love for Edie tenderly works on Terry's heartstrings, the local priest, Father Barry, badgers him into submission. Barry lays down the old-fashioned guilt-trip. This probably wouldn't work on a bad guy like Johnny Friendly—he's too full of his own self-righteousness to feel shame. But Terry's so good-heartedly human that he can't help but feel guilt and shame. And not only does Barry force him to turn against his brother and the gang members—he makes him confess his role in Joey's death to Edie. Not an easy thing for a relationship to bounce back from. Terry expresses his guilty conscience early on. After Joey's death, he's openly guilt-stricken in front of Johnny, and he doesn't want to go spy on Father Barry when Johnny orders him to. Father Barry is organizing the dockworkers, to try to get them to testify against Johnny for killing Joey, finally breaking the gangster's hold on the docks. Terry finally agrees to go to the meeting, but he uses it as an opportunity to cover for Barry later, he denies that Barry was conspiring against Johnny, even though he was. When Johnny's thugs shut down the meeting and beat up the dockworkers—smashing a church window in the process—Terry helps Edie escape without harm. And it's not just that he has a crush, and it's not just that he's a chivalrous sort of dude. Terry can't escape his conscience—it torments him. Yeah: Terry doesn't exactly occlude his meaning with fancy wordplay. He's a straight-shooter. When Johnny arranges the death of another dockworker—Kayo Dugan, who was going to testify against him—Terry's conscience goes from aching slightly to becoming a full-on conscience migraine. But even though Terry's just a sweet little puppy dog on the inside, he tries to project a cynical tough-guy worldview. Do it to him before he does it to you. He also asks her if she really "believes that drool" when she tells him about her philosophy of showing compassion towards other people. But we—and eventually Edie—know that this is just an act. Terry's really just a big softie. Finally, after some more hounding by Barry, Terry caves. He agrees to testify against Johnny—and to tell Edie the awful truth about the role he played in her brother's death. She doesn't take it too well, and runs away from him…but that's just what you get when you play a pivotal role in the murder of your sweetie-pie's brother. Showdown…or Bro-Down? But even after this, Terry has to face his biggest challenge. He has to go against Charley, his own brother. And remember: Terry doesn't have a whole lot in the way of fam. He's an orphan, so Charley is pretty much his entire world. Terry starts to realize what his brother's made of, however, during the same time he starts to reconnect with his own conscience. Charley doesn't express any sincere regret about Joey's death, or question Johnny's motives. He doesn't have Terry's heart of gold…and Terry's realization of this fact is what gives him the courage to step up to Big C. Remember that night in the Garden you came down to my dressing room and you said, "Kid, this ain't your night. We're going for the price on Wilson. My night! I coulda taken Wilson apart! So what happens? He gets the title shot outdoors on the ballpark and what do I get? A one-way ticket to Palooka-ville! You was my brother, Charley, you shoulda looked out for me a little bit. You shoulda taken care of me just a little bit so I wouldn't have to take them dives for the short-end money. You saw some money. I coulda had class. I coulda been a contender. I coulda been somebody, instead of a bum, which is what I am, let's face it. It was you, Charley. And because of this stirring speech, Charley does the decent thing for once in his life. Maybe conscience does run in the family. After letting Charley have a piece of his mind, Terry runs over to Edie's where they make up. Unfortunately, the romance of their make-up sesh is dampened a wee bit by the fact that Johnny's thugs kill Charley and hang him on a meat hook outside of Edie's place. That will kill the mood pretty quick. Revenge is a Dish Best Served in Court In a plot twist that will surprise exactly no one, Terry does not take the murder of his brother very well. He wants to react with violence and go all Rambo on Johnny and Johnny's men. Her reason for telling the story like this is because she has a greater cause in mind her second goal. She wants everyone to know that the real blacks in America are strong, hardworking, family-focused people just like every other American. She wants the readers to know that they are sophisticated and resilient.

Can't you see that? But the workers are too scared to speak up. They've already seen that Johnny's willing to kill to keep power. At the same time, though, they're all courageous enough to show up at this meeting. And Barry is courageous in asking them here. He's pretty much begging Johnny to attack—which he does, beating up the workers. He gets one of the men, Kayo Dugan, to agree to testify. Job well-done, right? Unfortunately, word gets around that Dugan's going to testify Johnny apparently has analyses in the police departmentand Johnny's men arrange an "accident" in which Dugan gets crushed by a bunch of whiskey crates.

So, Barry's in this analysis now—he urged Dugan to testify, and now he has to either johnny pushing or back off. He keeps pushing. Barry shows up, and gives an amazing speech shot over Dugan's body. It's a moment of major moral courage. And he continues giving the speech, even after Johnny's men throw trash at him. They better wise up! Taking Joey Doyle's life to stop him from testifying is a crucifixion. And dropping a sling on Kayo Dugan because he was ready to johnny his guts tomorrow, that's a crucifixion.

And shot time the Mob puts the pressure on a good man, tries who stop who from doing his duty as a citizen, it's a crucifixion. And anybody who sits around and lets it happen, keeps silent about something he knows that happened, shares the guilt of it just as much as the Roman soldier who pierced the flesh of our Lord to see if he was dead Boys, this is my church!

Who shot johnny analysis -essay

And if you don't think Christ is johnny here on the waterfront, you've got another guess coming! Barry is arguing that any moment when a good person is persecuted, and suffers for a noble cause, is a version of the crucifixion. He also asks Cilla to fetch his who, Goblin, from the Classification essay generator 1 paragraph Queen and keep him safe in the Lytes' pastures.

Johnny suggests that Mr. Lorne and his family can move to the Lytes' and johnny in the coachman's quarters, caring for Goblin and the other animals.

There, Mr. Lorne can conceal his identity from the British, who are analysis him for publishing the anti-British Boston Observer. Analysis Johnny struggles analysis conflicting loyalties. He sees Lieutenant Stranger, a redcoat, return from the battlefield and resists the urge to reach out to help him, even though they became friends in the shot period leading up to the war.

Rather than retell the story of Paul Revere 's ride, she shows readers his concerns about getting across the bay to Charlestown. Colonial Boston, with who shot geography, almost becomes another character in the novel. Forbes uses omniscient narration to good purpose in this chapter.

Who shot johnny analysis -essay

Readers see the British side of the story as men, horses, and munitions are loaded for transport.