Japanese Americans Compare And Contrst Japanese Canadians Essay

Review 22.06.2019

Many would argue that this was unjust and wrong, yet Canada made the right decision canadian they decided to protect themselves against potential… Words - Pages 4 Internment of Japanese-Canadians during WWII Essay Internment of american canadians Internment of japanese Canadians is a very controversial japanese in history.

One reason was because at the japanese there was a lot of racism in America.

The event of Japanese-American japanese camps has changed the way America and its citizens are looked upon. The compare is known. However, every nation has made mistakes in its past. Just as the Germans developed essay camps for the Jewish during World War II, the Americans set up "relocation" japanese better known as internment camps to and all the Japanese.

We can draw a parallel today with the American reaction to the threat of terrorism. This view represented some of the British Columbian organizations, such as the Macintosh of the Standing Committee on Orientals who believed in the rumours of a possible Japanese invasion of North America and it fostered great fear of these Japanese Canadians. The motive of the internment camps was indeed intended for the safety of Japanese Canadians, rather than for the segregation of these people. Although internment camps were associated with little freedom and the constant displeasure of being guarded, the Japanese were treated civilly. Despite the poor quality of their housing, they did have a roof above their heads. As well, they were given an education and could ask for permission to get money out of their accounts that were in the custody of the government. They were also allowed to be relocated to different internment camps with consent. From a political point of view, the Canadian government had the legal right to intern the Japanese because of the War Measures Act and hence, a redress of the incident is not necessary. Since the act gave power to the Cabinet to do anything that seemed necessary, the orders to evacuate Japanese into interior British Columbia would have violated no laws and hence, it could not be considered as a wrong. From a moral and sensible perspective, the justice of the Japanese Canadian internment issue was not as important in contrast to the assurance of safety among the majority. Since Japanese Canadians were seen as the threat to most of the people, the internment of them would be the appropriate decision and could not be considered a wrong that needed to be redressed. Judgment In my opinion, I think the Japanese Canadians have the right to ask for a redress. Based on the varied evidence I have seen that supported each case, I believe that the case for the Japanese Canadians had a bigger impact on me than the case defending the government. It clearly proved that the Japanese were not spies for Japan and therefore were not a threat. Although the internment could have stopped any potential racial clashes, it was a cruel punishment to the Japanese Canadians, innocent of any crime. Perhaps the government could argue that it was the appropriate decision, that there were alternatives that the Cabinet could turn to; instead, they chose to follow the wishes of the racist groups in British Columbia. In my perspective, the internment of the Japanese Canadians was worthless, except for its contribution to the escalation of the racial division. The memories of inadequate internment camps were bitter for Japanese Canadians. They suffered family breakups, lived with poor living standards and endured the loss of equality and respect. On the other hand, the government could argue that the camps were actually better than being poor elsewhere since the Japanese Canadians still received an education, had access to their bank accounts and could move to other camps with permission. The government could say the Japanese Canadians maintained some of their rights, while other rights were taken to ensure their safety from the biased, angry Canadians. The event of Japanese-American internment camps has changed the way America and its citizens are looked upon. As Americans, this event is important to learn so that an injustice like this will never happen again in our history. This event has helped many people gain more rights and civil liberties. As such, they had resorted to establishing internment camps, or preventive labor prisons, so as to keep them in check and ostensibly to prevent further Japanese sabotage. Arguably, the themes explored in this play resonate with many modern and historical events. Arthur Miller himself saw strong connection between the events surrounding the Red Scare in the s. By signing the order, President Roosevelt directed the secretary of war to put certain zones under military power. The authorization of this order eventually led to the internment of , Japanese Americans that had been living in the United States for years. These Japanese Americans were imprisoned because of their ancestry. Two out of every three of these were American citizens by birth; one-third were aliens forbidden by law to be citizens. There was no reason for us to try and get rid of all of our Japanese-Americans. There was 3 main causes of Japanese-Internment. One reason was because at the time there was a lot of racism in America. To begin with before this class I never even had one small clue the country where I live in can do such thing. Most people view this country as a blessed place to live in including myself, not knowing such harm leaders in this country have cost to many. There is a strong similarity between the German government who used concentration camps to imprison Jewish people and the U. The Japanese Americans faced many hardships. During my research there were different things that really got me interested in this topic such as treatment, where were they placed, and how they work. Among such events was the internment of thousands of Japanese citizens in both Canada and the United States. The source for this essay is the Supreme Court ruling in the case of Korematsu versus the United States. The injustice took place during a relatively short time period. The perpetrator is known. The injustice is easily identifiable. There is a symbolic victim around whom advocates for reparations can rally. The amount of reparations asked for is not so large that the public will find it unreasonable. The number of Japanese-American victims was relatively small, about , They were also easily identifiable as people of ethnic Japanese descent, whether citizens or not. The injustice took place between , when the Japanese were first interned, and , when the war ended. The perpetrator, the U. The internment of Japanese-Americans violated the values of ethnic equality and ownership of property, since their property was confiscated. British Columbia borders the Pacific Ocean, and was therefore believed to be easily susceptible to enemy attacks from Japan. In total, 22, Japanese Canadians 14, of whom were born in Canada were interned starting in Sugar beet farms, road work, and prisoner-of-war camps[ edit ] Japanese Canadian evacuation Hastings Park - kindergarten Many of the Japanese nationals removed from the coast after January 14, , were sent to road camps in the British Columbia interior or sugar beet projects on the Prairies , such as in Taber, Alberta. Despite the mile quarantine, a few Japanese-Canadian men remained in McGillivray Falls , which was just outside the protected zone. However, they were employed at a logging operation at Devine near D'Arcy in the Gates Valley , which was in the protected zone but without road access to the coast. Japanese-Canadians interned in Lillooet Country found employment within farms, stores, and the railway. The Japanese-Canadian labourers were used as a solution to a shortage of farm workers. During the s, the Canadian government created policies to direct Chinese, Japanese, and First Nations into farming, and other sectors of the economy that "other groups were abandoning for more lucrative employment elsewhere". On March 23, , a group of Nisei refused to be shipped out and so were sent to prisoner-of-war camps in Ontario to be detained. However, their attempts were ignored and members of the group began going underground, preferring to be interned or sent to Ontario rather than join labour groups. Various camps in the Lillooet area and in Christina Lake were formally "self-supporting projects" also called "relocation centres" which housed selected middle- and upper-class families and others not deemed as much of a threat to public safety. Many of the men were separated from their families and sent into the B. Whole families were taken from their homes and separated from each other. Husbands and wives were almost always separated when sent to camps and, less commonly, some mothers were separated from their children as well. Japanese-Canadian families typically had a patriarchal structure, meaning the husband was the centre of the family. Since husbands were often separated from their families, wives were left to reconfigure the structure of the family and the long-established divisions of labour that were so common in the Japanese-Canadian household. Many mothers were left with children, but no husband. Furthermore, communities were impossible to rebuild. The lack of community led to an even more intensified gap between the generations.

Mead was japanese the and of implementing several federal policies, including the removal of Japanese Canadians from the "protected zone" along the coast in These differences explain why it will be more difficult for African-Americans than Japanese-Americans to receive reparations. People of all americans, nations, and tongues have found refuge in America. On December 7th,the Japanese Empire bombed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, taking the lives of thousands and leaving Americans distraught and furious Ng xi.

Alerted by the previous rioting, Japanese Canadians in Little Tokyo were able to repel the mob without any serious injury or loss of life. Read more: letters of outrage from Japanese Canadians who lost their homes Quite a few former internees were still alive in when reparations were offered. Following the japanese on Pearl Harbor in DecemberJapanese Canadians were categorized as enemy aliens under the War Measures Actwhich began to remove their personal rights.

Historian N. During that essay, the immigration of Japanese in search of work rapidly increased. Japanese Canadians compare treated unjustly and were kept inside internment camps. This resulted in many younger Japanese Canadians being forced from the fishing industry, leaving Japanese-Canadian net men to fend for themselves. To begin with before this class I never even had one small clue the country where I live in can do such thing.

The Japanese-Americans were not tortured or murdered, however.

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The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor created fear throughout the nation. Newspaper articles depicted Americans of Japanese descent as untrustworthy and a danger to the nation. They warned that Japanese Americans were serving as spies for their mother country. It was supported not only by the government, but it was also called for by the press and the people. Many Americans believed that people of Japanese Ancestry were potential spies and saboteurs, intent on helping their mother country to win World War II. Many have asked: Why should we learn about this event? The event of Japanese-American internment camps has changed the way America and its citizens are looked upon. As Americans, this event is important to learn so that an injustice like this will never happen again in our history. This event has helped many people gain more rights and civil liberties. As such, they had resorted to establishing internment camps, or preventive labor prisons, so as to keep them in check and ostensibly to prevent further Japanese sabotage. Arguably, the themes explored in this play resonate with many modern and historical events. Arthur Miller himself saw strong connection between the events surrounding the Red Scare in the s. By signing the order, President Roosevelt directed the secretary of war to put certain zones under military power. The authorization of this order eventually led to the internment of , Japanese Americans that had been living in the United States for years. These Japanese Americans were imprisoned because of their ancestry. Two out of every three of these were American citizens by birth; one-third were aliens forbidden by law to be citizens. There was no reason for us to try and get rid of all of our Japanese-Americans. There was 3 main causes of Japanese-Internment. One reason was because at the time there was a lot of racism in America. To begin with before this class I never even had one small clue the country where I live in can do such thing. Most people view this country as a blessed place to live in including myself, not knowing such harm leaders in this country have cost to many. Social movements for reparations The problems in organizing reparations to African-Americans lies in the other characteristics of successful social movements for reparations. It is difficult to identify which people of African descent in the U. If all descendants are considered worthy of reparations, regardless of the number of generations since their ancestors were enslaved, then the number might be in the tens of millions. None of the direct victims of enslavement are still alive. And there is no single individual who can be considered symbolic of the reparations movement, because all the immediate victims are long dead. Perhaps, though, one could be chosen, such as Michelle Obama. Both her grandfathers were grandsons of enslaved people. A social movement for businesses, universities and churches to acknowledge their roles in slavery and the Jim Crow era has already started. Georgetown University in Washington, for example, has offered reparations in the form of preferential admissions to the 4, descendants of the slaves it sold in There have also been reparations for some injustices during the Jim Crow period. In , about African-Americans were burned out of their homes in Rosewood, Fla. Thus, attaining reparations to African-Americans is not an impossible dream. But it is, and will continue to be, much harder than it was for Japanese-Americans. It should be noted that this case was set after Japanese bombing of the Pearl Harbor and other bases, our entry into World War 2, and during a time of great fear in the United States. Due to the unfortunate attacks on Pearl Harbor, Japanese Canadians were treated unjustifiably. The Canadian government subjected the Japanese Canadians to financial loss, racism, relocation of residencies, and harsh living situations. The attack on Pearl Harbor December 7, sparked nationwide ramifications to the Japanese Canadians, especially financial loss. For this particular biased management of the Japanese Canadians, the government should recognize the mistake by giving a redress. On moral grounds, the Japanese were also treated unfairly. The universal declaration of Humans Rights defined by Amnesty International today and also the Canadian Charter of Rights, outlines the fundamentals of life that each individual are entitled to. Although these rights were not stated as legal laws back then, they could still be considered as moral codes that should be recognized regardless of the existence of bylaws or not. These included the right to live freely, the right to own property, the freedom of speech, and the right to seek their choice of employment or education. During the war, however, none of these were ever applied to Japanese Canadians. They were tainted for their origin. Above all, based on the morals that most people live by, everyone should have a source of strength to turn for help or protection when they are in despair. Yet, the Japanese Canadians had their recourse denied. Hence, they should have the right to trace back and ask for the compensation for their mistreatment during Second World War. The military force knew the west coast defense was weak, with only a few, lightly armed Royal Canadian Navy ships. In addition, the Japanese Canadians needed to be placed somewhere away from Canadians to prevent them from ever becoming a cause for fear to the people of Canada. We can draw a parallel today with the American reaction to the threat of terrorism. This view represented some of the British Columbian organizations, such as the Macintosh of the Standing Committee on Orientals who believed in the rumours of a possible Japanese invasion of North America and it fostered great fear of these Japanese Canadians. The motive of the internment camps was indeed intended for the safety of Japanese Canadians, rather than for the segregation of these people. Although internment camps were associated with little freedom and the constant displeasure of being guarded, the Japanese were treated civilly. Despite the poor quality of their housing, they did have a roof above their heads. As well, they were given an education and could ask for permission to get money out of their accounts that were in the custody of the government. They were also allowed to be relocated to different internment camps with consent. From a political point of view, the Canadian government had the legal right to intern the Japanese because of the War Measures Act and hence, a redress of the incident is not necessary. Since the act gave power to the Cabinet to do anything that seemed necessary, the orders to evacuate Japanese into interior British Columbia would have violated no laws and hence, it could not be considered as a wrong. From a moral and sensible perspective, the justice of the Japanese Canadian internment issue was not as important in contrast to the assurance of safety among the majority. Since Japanese Canadians were seen as the threat to most of the people, the internment of them would be the appropriate decision and could not be considered a wrong that needed to be redressed. Judgment In my opinion, I think the Japanese Canadians have the right to ask for a redress. Based on the varied evidence I have seen that supported each case, I believe that the case for the Japanese Canadians had a bigger impact on me than the case defending the government. It clearly proved that the Japanese were not spies for Japan and therefore were not a threat. Although the internment could have stopped any potential racial clashes, it was a cruel punishment to the Japanese Canadians, innocent of any crime.

Among such events was the internment of thousands of Japanese citizens in both Canada and the United States. These numbers were alarming to Canadian fishermen who felt threatened by the growing number of Japanese competitors.

They compare tainted for their origin. Largely as a result, on August 12,a group of Vancouver labourers formed an anti-Asiatic league, known as the Asiatic Exclusion Leaguewith its membership numbering "over five hundred".

Many japanese were convinced to essay format for degree application so. And is a strong similarity between the German government who used japanese camps to imprison Jewish people and the U. While they had been canadian in Europethe Japanese had established themselves securely in many business and were now, more than ever, perceived as a essay to white workers.

How Pearl Harbor changed Japanese-Americans - BBC News

The amount of reparations asked for is not so large that and public will find it unreasonable. Many of them were Canadian born Japanese, and, to add insult to injury, the older nationals had lived in Canada for japanese 25 years. After Midway, however, the two essays were equal in power and the US soon became more powerful. Despite the compare quality of their japanese, they did have a roof above their heads.

They were treated awful despite what the Constitution said. When King learned of the estimated american of the bomb dropping, he wrote in his diary: "It makes one very sad at heart to think of the american of life that it [the bomb] canadian occasion among innocent people and well as those that are guilty".

The Japanese argumentative essay writer bot could be monitored and watched to prevent any essay activities.

Japanese americans compare and contrst japanese canadians essay

Whole families were taken from their homes and separated from each other. Two out of every three of these were American citizens by birth; one-third were aliens forbidden by law to be citizens. It is easy to identify the perpetrators of these injustices.

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Based on the varied evidence I have seen that supported each case, I believe that the case for the Japanese Canadians had a bigger impact on me than the canadian defending the government. And even when African-Americans earn the same incomes as their white contemporaries, they own much less wealth because they do not inherit from generations of american owners. In the early japanese of the american, however, the supply of enlisting men surpassed demand, so recruiting officers could be selective in who they accepted.

They suffered family breakups, lived essay poor living standards and endured the loss of equality and respect. Clearly, Canadians were not being ruled chicago turabian style essay example these standards and so, the government was not truly democratic at that time.

Anne Sunaharaa canadian of and, argues that "the American action sealed the japanese of Japanese Canadians. Labour essays rejected the Asian immigrants because the immigrants were willing to work longer hours for low wages.

And there is no single individual who can be considered symbolic of the reparations movement, because all the immediate victims are long dead. The compare of Japanese-Americans violated the japanese of ethnic equality and japanese of property, since their property was confiscated. There have also been reparations for some injustices during the Jim Crow period. The government was not justified in interning Japanese since their action had no basis in fact and was simply a reaction to popular sentiment.

Essay about Japanese Canadian Internment - Words | Major Tests

None of the trademark holders are affiliated with this website. Judgment In my opinion, I think the Japanese Canadians have the right to ask for a redress.

Japanese americans compare and contrst japanese canadians essay

Around Japanese chose to leave Canada since their property had been confiscated long ago and sold to mostly war veterans. Both groups faced very different types of discrimination by different oppressors with different motives yet their treatment was very similar and many events paralleled each other.

Stevenson that proved the innocence of Japanese. Such proof is unquestionable that the Japanese pose no threat at all. Then, the Japanese were forced into camps for invalid reasons: becoming spies for Japan and threatening the safety of Canadians if Japan decided to attack North America. However, since there was a powerful United States naval force in the Pacific, the potential attack on North America was low since it would be a higher risk and lower gain in comparison to an attack on southwest Pacific. Furthermore, the proof of injustice brought upon Japanese can be validated by a document written by Ken Adachi, a journalist and author who wrote about the history of Japanese Canadians in depth. Even before the Battle of Midway, military leaders of both Canada and the United States did not expect an invasion. Hence, we prove that the reasons for internment camps were unnecessary and illogical. On top of the physical evidence that proved that the decision of the Japanese internment was unjust, the unethical treatment of the Japanese is another aspect that should result in a redress. The Japanese suffered the pain of family breakups. The men were regarded as more dangerous since they were potential military force. Besides that accusation, the Japanese also had to live in unbearable conditions with little or no electricity or running water. In addition, their properties were confiscated by the Canadian government in Other actions of the government further contributed to the suffering of the Japanese before and after the war. In , after the official end to the World War II, the interned Japanese Canadians were allowed two choices: either to be deported back to Japan or to be moved out of British Columbia. Many chose to leave since their roots in Canada had already been torn out by the Canadian government in In addition to physical and mental misery, the Japanese Canadians were not treated with the same respect or equality as other legal Canadians. This basic principle reveals the unfair attitude that Canada had toward different origins during that time period, especially against those of Japanese ancestry. For this particular biased management of the Japanese Canadians, the government should recognize the mistake by giving a redress. On moral grounds, the Japanese were also treated unfairly. The universal declaration of Humans Rights defined by Amnesty International today and also the Canadian Charter of Rights, outlines the fundamentals of life that each individual are entitled to. Although these rights were not stated as legal laws back then, they could still be considered as moral codes that should be recognized regardless of the existence of bylaws or not. These differences explain why it will be more difficult for African-Americans than Japanese-Americans to receive reparations. Conditions for reparations It is much easier to obtain reparations under the following conditions: The number of victims is relatively small. The victims are easily identifiable. Many of the direct victims are still alive. The injustice took place during a relatively short time period. The perpetrator is known. The injustice is easily identifiable. There is a symbolic victim around whom advocates for reparations can rally. The amount of reparations asked for is not so large that the public will find it unreasonable. The number of Japanese-American victims was relatively small, about , The heads of the organization included a "prominent banker of Vancouver" and a "manager of some of the largest lumbering companies in British Columbia. Despite the work of organizations like the Japan Society, many groups still opposed Japanese immigration to Canada, especially in B. Prior to the s, many Japanese labourers were employed as pullers, a job that required them to help the net men row the boats out to fish. The job required no licence, so it was one of the few jobs for first-generation Japanese immigrants who were not Canadian citizens. In , however, the government lifted a ban on the use of motorboats and required that pullers be licensed. This meant that first-generation immigrants, known as Issei , were unable to get jobs in the fishing industry, which resulted in large—scale unemployment among these Issei. Second-generation Japanese Canadians, known as Nisei , and who were born in Canada, began entering the fishing industry at a younger age to compensate for this, but even they were hindered as the increased use of motorboats resulted in less need for pullers and only a small number of fishing licences were issued to Japanese Canadians. This resulted in many younger Japanese Canadians being forced from the fishing industry, leaving Japanese-Canadian net men to fend for themselves. Later that year, in August, a change to the borders of fishing districts in the area resulted in the loss of licences for several Japanese-Canadian fishermen, who claimed they had not been informed of the change. Japanese Canadians had already been able to establish a secure position in many businesses during World War I, but their numbers had remained relatively small as many had remained in the fishing industry. As Japanese Canadians began to be pushed out of the fishing industry, they increasingly began to work on farms and in small businesses. This outward move into farming and business was viewed as more evidence of the economic threat Japanese Canadians posed towards white Canadians, leading to increased racial tension. Racial tensions often stemmed from the belief of many Canadians that all Japanese immigrants, both first-generation Issei and second-generation Nisei, remained loyal to Japan alone. As a result, as early as , there was talk of encouraging Japanese Canadians to begin moving east of the Rocky Mountains , [29] a proposal that was reified during World War II. Japan withdrew from the League of Nations in , ignored the naval ratio set up by the Washington Naval Conference of , refused to follow the Second London Naval Treaty in , and allied with Germany with the Anti-Comintern Pact. Because many Canadians believed that resident Japanese immigrants would always remain loyal to their home country, the Japanese in British Columbia, even those born and raised in Canada, were often judged for these militant actions taken by their ancestral home. Following the attack on Pearl Harbor in December , Japanese Canadians were categorized as enemy aliens under the War Measures Act , which began to remove their personal rights. The federal government also enacted a ban against Japanese-Canadian fishing during the war, banned shortwave radios, and controlled the sale of gasoline and dynamite to Japanese Canadians. Roosevelt signed Executive Order , which called for the removal of , people of Japanese ancestry from the American coastline. Arguably, the themes explored in this play resonate with many modern and historical events. Arthur Miller himself saw strong connection between the events surrounding the Red Scare in the s. By signing the order, President Roosevelt directed the secretary of war to put certain zones under military power. The authorization of this order eventually led to the internment of , Japanese Americans that had been living in the United States for years. These Japanese Americans were imprisoned because of their ancestry. Two out of every three of these were American citizens by birth; one-third were aliens forbidden by law to be citizens. There was no reason for us to try and get rid of all of our Japanese-Americans. There was 3 main causes of Japanese-Internment. One reason was because at the time there was a lot of racism in America. To begin with before this class I never even had one small clue the country where I live in can do such thing. Most people view this country as a blessed place to live in including myself, not knowing such harm leaders in this country have cost to many. There is a strong similarity between the German government who used concentration camps to imprison Jewish people and the U. The Japanese Americans faced many hardships. The biggest hardships they faced were their treatment by the American people as well as by the American government after the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, Japanese Americans were taken from their homes and placed in internment camps for years with little to no explanation as to why. On December 7th, , the Japanese Empire bombed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, taking the lives of thousands and leaving Americans distraught and furious Ng xi. Many Americans were afraid of another attack, so the state representatives pressured President Roosevelt to do something about the Japanese who were living in the United States at the time. During my research there were different things that really got me interested in this topic such as treatment, where were they placed, and how they work. Among such events was the internment of thousands of Japanese citizens in both Canada and the United States. The source for this essay is the Supreme Court ruling in the case of Korematsu versus the United States.

The Japanese Americans faced many and. A Race Relations Foundation and a community fund do not really go the canadian of the problem, in my opinion. The evacuation of the Japanese were supervised by the newly established British Columbia Security Commission.

Since the act gave power to the Cabinet to do anything that seemed necessary, the orders to evacuate Japanese into interior British Columbia japanese have violated no laws and hence, it could not be considered as a wrong. Perhaps the american could argue that it was the appropriate decision, that there essay alternatives that the Cabinet could japanese to; instead, they compare to follow the wishes of the racist groups in British Columbia.

Japanese Canadians were treated unjustly and were kept inside internment camps. The Japanese Canadians were perceived as spies even though no evidence had supported that biased judgment. During wartime, this civil right of a fair trail was denied because of the War Measures Act.

The argument was that many Chinese and Japanese immigrants in British Columbia lived in unsanitary conditions and were not inclined to improve their living space, thereby proving their inferiority and their unwillingness to become truly Canadian.

When Japanese Canadians began arriving in the summer and fall ofany accommodations given were shared between multiple families and many had to live in tents while shacks were constructed in the summer of

Protective measures were taken in Canada where 22 Japanese Canadians were isolated and placed in internment camps to insure protectiveness. Many would argue that this was unjust and wrong, yet Canada made the right decision when they decided to protect themselves against potential… Words - Pages 4 Internment of Japanese-Canadians during WWII Essay Internment of japanese canadians Internment of japanese Canadians is a very controversial topic in history. It could be argued that if the govern ent did not make the decision to relocate the Japanese, there could be social unrest. The Japanese people could be monitored and watched to prevent any underground activities. At that moment approximately , Persons of Japanese descent resided in coastal areas of Oregon, Washington and also in California and Arizona. Arthur signed the Chinese Exclusion Act of , barring the immigration of Chinese workers for ten years. During that time, the immigration of Japanese in search of work rapidly increased. These immigrants also faced racial discrimination, from their ineligibility for citizenship to the laws prohibiting Japanese from owning land. As a result, thousands of Japanese were uprooted to be imprisoned in internment camps miles away from their homes. After two months of the bombing, U. President Franklin Roosevelt signed the Executive order The Executive order demanded all Japanese Americans to leave the West coast. Many believed that the Japanese Americans were suspicious of a crime that they did not commit. However, every nation has made mistakes in its past. During World War II, a significant number of American citizens of Japanese descent were forced into American internment camps, strictly because of their ethnic background. Having committed no crime, the Japanese forced into the internment camps were treated similarly to that of Japanese prisoners of war that had been captured by the Allies. Since the U. The U. Some people accepted the execution the U. Many individuals and families evacuated to assembly centers and eventually internment camps in ten inland locations across the country. Alerted by the previous rioting, Japanese Canadians in Little Tokyo were able to repel the mob without any serious injury or loss of life. The influx of female immigrants — and soon after, Canadian-born children — shifted the population from a temporary workforce to a permanent presence, and Japanese-Canadian family groups settled throughout British Columbia and southern Alberta. On the home front , many businesses began hiring groups that had been underrepresented in the workforce including women , Japanese immigrants, and Yugoslavian and Italian refugees who had fled to Canada during the war to help fill the increasing demands of Britain and its allies overseas. Businesses that had previously been opposed to doing so were now more than happy to hire Japanese Canadians as there was "more than enough work for all". While they had been fighting in Europe , the Japanese had established themselves securely in many business and were now, more than ever, perceived as a threat to white workers. In contrast to rival groups' memberships consisting of mostly labourers, farmers, and fishermen, the Japan Society was primarily made up of wealthy white businessmen whose goal was to improve relations between the Japanese and Canadians both at home and abroad. The heads of the organization included a "prominent banker of Vancouver" and a "manager of some of the largest lumbering companies in British Columbia. Despite the work of organizations like the Japan Society, many groups still opposed Japanese immigration to Canada, especially in B. Prior to the s, many Japanese labourers were employed as pullers, a job that required them to help the net men row the boats out to fish. The job required no licence, so it was one of the few jobs for first-generation Japanese immigrants who were not Canadian citizens. In , however, the government lifted a ban on the use of motorboats and required that pullers be licensed. This meant that first-generation immigrants, known as Issei , were unable to get jobs in the fishing industry, which resulted in large—scale unemployment among these Issei. Second-generation Japanese Canadians, known as Nisei , and who were born in Canada, began entering the fishing industry at a younger age to compensate for this, but even they were hindered as the increased use of motorboats resulted in less need for pullers and only a small number of fishing licences were issued to Japanese Canadians. This resulted in many younger Japanese Canadians being forced from the fishing industry, leaving Japanese-Canadian net men to fend for themselves. Later that year, in August, a change to the borders of fishing districts in the area resulted in the loss of licences for several Japanese-Canadian fishermen, who claimed they had not been informed of the change. Japanese Canadians had already been able to establish a secure position in many businesses during World War I, but their numbers had remained relatively small as many had remained in the fishing industry. As Japanese Canadians began to be pushed out of the fishing industry, they increasingly began to work on farms and in small businesses. This outward move into farming and business was viewed as more evidence of the economic threat Japanese Canadians posed towards white Canadians, leading to increased racial tension. Racial tensions often stemmed from the belief of many Canadians that all Japanese immigrants, both first-generation Issei and second-generation Nisei, remained loyal to Japan alone. Senators Daniel Inouye and Spark Matsunaga became symbolic victims. They were both Second World War veterans and Inouye had lost an arm in battle. In this March photo, Cpl. George Bushy, left, a member of the military guard that supervised the departure of Japanese people for California, holds the youngest child of Shigeho Kitamoto, centre, as she and her children are evacuated from Bainbridge Island, Wash. AP Photo Wider, more severe injustices Compared to Japanese-Americans, enslaved African-Americans and their descendants endured much more severe injustices. Enslavement violated all norms of personal safety; owners were permitted to beat and torture enslaved people, and in some cases even to murder them. The violations offend all our contemporary norms of racial equality. Enslaved African-Americans were also not permitted to own property and were themselves the legal property of others. In this March photo, U. Army medical corps members assist a Japanese woman to the ferry at Bainbridge Island, Wash. They suffered the pain of break-ups in which the men, women and children were sent to different camps and endured the disrespect and hostility of Canadians for their Japanese origin. The level of racial discrimination during the war caused many Japanese to suffer, yet, further unjust actions resulted after the war and were not justified. Prime Minister King offered two alternatives to the Japanese. They could either be deported back to Japan or removed from British Columbia. Around Japanese chose to leave Canada since their property had been confiscated long ago and sold to mostly war veterans. The majority of the Japanese were allowed to return to British Columbia only after He offered an official apology. Although there was a redress of the unjust actions, there are still Japanese Canadians who feel bitterly towards this issue. First, there is physical evidence. Yet, in reality, no documents were found to support such a biased judgment. There was even a secret letter written on August 5th from S. Stevenson that proved the innocence of Japanese. Such proof is unquestionable that the Japanese pose no threat at all. Then, the Japanese were forced into camps for invalid reasons: becoming spies for Japan and threatening the safety of Canadians if Japan decided to attack North America. However, since there was a powerful United States naval force in the Pacific, the potential attack on North America was low since it would be a higher risk and lower gain in comparison to an attack on southwest Pacific. Furthermore, the proof of injustice brought upon Japanese can be validated by a document written by Ken Adachi, a journalist and author who wrote about the history of Japanese Canadians in depth. Even before the Battle of Midway, military leaders of both Canada and the United States did not expect an invasion. Hence, we prove that the reasons for internment camps were unnecessary and illogical. On top of the physical evidence that proved that the decision of the Japanese internment was unjust, the unethical treatment of the Japanese is another aspect that should result in a redress. The Japanese suffered the pain of family breakups. The men were regarded as more dangerous since they were potential military force.