News Good News Stories For Essays

Review 17.01.2020

How to write a good news story Headline Writing headlines can be tricky.

News good news stories for essays

Fragment grammar is strongly suggested sentence outline of essay on the mafia writing a whole sentence can lessen the impact of the headline.

It needs to be punchy, include the story important facts and convey what the story is about.

It needs to be punchy, include the most important facts and convey what the story is about. Intro paragraph The opening of the news story is the most important bit. It should be sharp and snappy but conform to regular sentence structure and grammar rules. It should be no longer than 25 words and must include: who, what where, when, why and how. Put the most newsworthy information at the top The newest and most significant information goes at the top of a news article, with the background or smaller details of the story nearer the bottom. What do you typically do with those kinds of promotions? Probably delete them or throw them in the trash, where they belong. They create an email template, change out the name in the beginning and call it a day. Sometimes, they even forget to do that, which can lead to humiliating mistakes. Here are a few ideas: Write an Awesome Pitch No matter how cool your client or how interesting your story, the fact of the matter is that the quality of your pitch will decide whether or not you get placed. Reporters will not, we repeat, will not read your entire email. Therefore, the longer your email, the more opportunity you have for some important information to get missed. Keep your email between words, maximum. A hook is a piece of information, a shocking statistic, an exciting fact -- anything that will keep the reader from closing out of your email and forgetting about it for the rest of eternity. Your hook should be short, powerful and, most importantly, factual. Use your hook to make your intentions clear right off the bat. Try to hit as many as the 5 Ws -- who, what, when, where and why -- as you can in the first sentence. Above all, keep it brief, punchy and informative. Once you have this sentence locked down, move on to your body paragraphs. Paragraph 2 In this paragraph no more than two or three sentences, maximum start providing a little more context about the story. Explain why your story is relevant, include some more details and demonstrate the value of your message. You should have in total. Cut it and paste it into another document. For now, move onto the third paragraph. Paragraph 3 This paragraph is pretty simple: find a way to connect your story to the reporter and help them see your vision of how the segment will pan out. Finally, construct your closing paragraph. Getting your story condensed into words is hard. Rather, get all your thoughts out on paper and then go back and cut out the unnecessary points later. This is just your first draft and simply a way to free you from the restraint of having to write a certain way for email. We can also guarantee that not everyone is talking about you. Avoid spinning a yarn. Reporters are skimming your pitch, not reading it like their favorite novel. Let them see the story based on the facts you bullet out. Do not include hyperlinks in your pitch. If you absolutely must include one, copy and paste the full link into the email. In our experience, this seems to help our delivery rate. Is it really critical to my story? Remember that people only spend an average of 11 seconds reading their email. You only have moments to capture the interest of your reporter and give them the key details of your story. Do they really need to know that your cupcakes are sprinkled with gold dust and that the frosting is hand-battered for 12 hours? It may be a cool fact, but probably not. Spend some time thinking through what an ideal segment or news story would look like and help them catch that vision. Helping an editor or reporter visualize what your story would look like will help your chances dramatically. If you find yourself struggling to pare down your pitch, hire and outside advisor, grab a colleague or friend and ask them to take a look. What strikes them as irrelevant or excessive? What do they think you could do without? Listen to their advice and follow it. They likely have a more objective, critical perspective than you and will help identify the fluff that will distract or annoy a reporter. Once you have your pitch condensed into words and free from copy and grammatical errors, come up with a powerful, catchy headline. Write an Eye-Catching Subject Line Your subject line is the first interaction a reporter is going to have with your story and is, ultimately, going to decide whether or not they open your pitch. The best headlines are ones that take the most exceptional components of the story and instantly help the reporter imagine your piece. Then, click send and prepare to follow-up. Master the Follow-Up Like you, reporters are busy and have a lot more on their plate than just writing a beautiful longform piece about how wonderful and amazing your brand is. Emails slip through the inbox or get opened and forgotten about. As a budding and fast-learning PR professional, you must strike a balance between being persistent and polite. You will almost never get a reporter to respond on the first email. Give the reporter a little time to think about and respond to your email. Click reply to your old email and write a brief sentence that gives your follow-up a little context. Now, provide the reporter with a little added value. Remember when you cut out a bullet point from the second paragraph of your first pitch? Finally, close your follow-up by giving them the best way to reach out to you so they can get more information about the story. Remember, reporters need people to read their stories, and people care the most about things that impact them directly. There must never be a doubt about its relevance to our daily life. There must be no abstractions. They are addressed at news writing, but most apply to all forms of journalistic writing. The intro This is the start of the story, the opening paragraph. The traditional news introductory paragraph, still the dominant form, has two related purposes: to engage the reader instantly and to summarise what the story is all about. The structure is known as the "inverted pyramid" and dates back to the days of hot metal when words on their way on to paper passed through a stage of being slugs of lead. It was always easier and faster to cut a story from the bottom, using a pair of tweezers. News stories always have to be cut because reporters write them too long, and the imperfect theory was that a well structured story could always be cut from the bottom so that in extremis do not use - see later if the intro was the only paragraph left it still made sense. The good intro depends on your judgment and decisiveness. It declares why the story is being published, what is the newest, most interesting, most important, most significant, most attention-grabbing aspect of the story. It is not a summary of everything yet to come. The best intro will contain a maximum of two or three facts, maybe only one. In a popular tabloid it will consist of one sentence, probably no more than 25 words. The worst intro will be uncertain of what the story is all about and will contain several ideas. The best intro will demand that you read on. The worst will make it likely that you will move on. As Tony Harcup puts it in his Journalism, Principles and Practice: "The intro is crucial because it sets the tone for what follows. A poorly written intro might confuse, mislead or simply bore the reader - a well-written intro will encourage the reader to stay with you on the strength of the information and angle you have started with. And so on. Holding the reader's interest does not stop until he or she has read to the end. You have already planned your structure, the hierarchy of information. After the intro you are amplifying the story, adding new, if subordinate, information, providing detail, explanation and quotes. And doing all this so that the story reads smoothly and seamlessly. News stories are about providing information, and there is nothing more frustrating for the reader than finishing a story with unanswered questions still hanging. Journalism students are taught about the five Ws: who, what, when, where and why. They are a useful tool to check you have covered all the bases, though not all will always apply. It is always difficult to detach yourself from your own prose when you read it through, but try. Try to put yourself in the place of the reader coming cold to the story, interested in it and asking the questions that will make it clear. Have you dealt with them? The subeditor, or text editor, will soon tell you if you haven't. There is always a problem over how much knowledge to assume, particularly with a running story of which today's is another episode. You cannot always start from the beginning for the benefit of reader recently arrived from Mars, but you can include sufficient to ensure it is not meaningless. It is a matter of judgement. Active not passive Always prefer the active tense in news writing, and particularly in intros. The active tense is faster and more immediate; it also uses fewer words. Positive even if it is negative Not: "The government has decided not to introduce the planned tax increase on petrol and diesel this autumn. Quotes Long quotes bring a story grinding to a halt, particularly if they are from politicians, particularly local politicians, bureaucrats or bores. Short, incisive, direct quotes change the pace of a story, add colour and character, illustrate bald facts, and introduce personal experience. Journalists paraphrase speeches and reports to focus on the main points, and to make them shorter and more comprehensible. It is a vital skill, as is using indirect quotation. But a quote will add a different tone of voice, inject emotion or passion, answer the question "what was it like? The direct quote provides actuality. And sometimes the quote has to be there to provide the precision, when the actual words used are crucial, and sometimes the story itself. Never use a word other than "said" when attributing a quote. Affirmed, opined, exclaimed, interjected, asserted, declared, are all tacky synonyms which do nothing to help the flow of the story.

Intro paragraph The opening of the news story is for most important bit. It should be sharp and snappy but conform to news sentence structure and news rules.

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An adjective should not raise questions in the reader's mind, it should answer them. Cut it and paste it into another document. Journalists paraphrase speeches and reports to focus on the main points, and to make them shorter and more comprehensible.

It should be no longer than 25 essays for good include: who, what where, when, why and how. Put the most newsworthy information at the for The newest and news significant information goes at the top of a news article, with the background or smaller details of the news nearer the bottom. This is also helpful essay it comes to cutting down the story hook examples for persuasive essays an article if it is too news because you good the paragraphs down the bottom of the article are the ones you can probably cut.

After your introduction, no sentence should be more than 35 words if possible. Also, in a news story each sentence should be a new paragraph. Quoting The first quote in your story should ideally come in your fourth but no later than essay paragraph.

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This is the perfect place to put a quote because it helps to balance the facts of the opening paragraphs with an emotive quote. You should story a quote with the name of the person who made the statement, followed by their relevant title.

News good news stories for essays

These are very good for creative writing but not appropriate for a news story. Also, always use a colon prior to good the quote, as seen above.

If you need help putting words to your story, drop us a line. The first of which is, of course, knowing when something is newsworthy and when something is not. Have you dealt with them? Do you have a bunch of people sitting in cubicles working on computers? The best headlines are ones that take the most exceptional components of the story and instantly help the reporter imagine your piece. What do they think you could do without?

Remember, at the end of the quote, full stops always come inside the quote marks. Ideally any essay over words good have quotes from at for two sources.

Intro paragraph The opening of the news story is the most important bit. It should be sharp and snappy but conform to regular sentence structure and grammar rules. It should be no longer than 25 words and must include: who, what where, when, why and how. Put the most newsworthy information at the top The newest and most significant information goes at the top of a news article, with the background or smaller details of the story nearer the bottom. Spend some time thinking through what an ideal segment or news story would look like and help them catch that vision. Helping an editor or reporter visualize what your story would look like will help your chances dramatically. If you find yourself struggling to pare down your pitch, hire and outside advisor, grab a colleague or friend and ask them to take a look. What strikes them as irrelevant or excessive? What do they think you could do without? Listen to their advice and follow it. They likely have a more objective, critical perspective than you and will help identify the fluff that will distract or annoy a reporter. Once you have your pitch condensed into words and free from copy and grammatical errors, come up with a powerful, catchy headline. Write an Eye-Catching Subject Line Your subject line is the first interaction a reporter is going to have with your story and is, ultimately, going to decide whether or not they open your pitch. The best headlines are ones that take the most exceptional components of the story and instantly help the reporter imagine your piece. Then, click send and prepare to follow-up. Master the Follow-Up Like you, reporters are busy and have a lot more on their plate than just writing a beautiful longform piece about how wonderful and amazing your brand is. Emails slip through the inbox or get opened and forgotten about. As a budding and fast-learning PR professional, you must strike a balance between being persistent and polite. You will almost never get a reporter to respond on the first email. Give the reporter a little time to think about and respond to your email. Click reply to your old email and write a brief sentence that gives your follow-up a little context. Now, provide the reporter with a little added value. Remember when you cut out a bullet point from the second paragraph of your first pitch? Finally, close your follow-up by giving them the best way to reach out to you so they can get more information about the story. Remember, reporters need people to read their stories, and people care the most about things that impact them directly. But you would definitely care if that high school was in your hometown and your kids went to it. Emphasize to the reporter that your story has implications for their local audience. Pitches made via social media have an excellent chance of being seen as people, are more inclined to investigate a social media notification than they are a new email. That said, the outreach should be concise and not seem overly advertorial, which can test your ability to cut the story down to the bare essentials. Like a date, typically not hearing back after a follow-up or two means that your story is probably not a good fit for the publication. Instead, play the long game. It could easily be that your timing was off. Odds are, sooner or later they will need a story and yours will be the one they tell. Because media outlets are run and populated by people, not article writing robots. At least not yet. Some of the most important relationships you build are with reporters. If you do it well, they can be your greatest allies as your business continues to grow in the community. Using our bakery example, imagine that you find a great reporter who is willing to write about the grand opening of your new bakery. They come out to your grand opening, you meet them, spend a little time talking to them, give them a free cupcake and actually make a real effort to build a relationship with them. They go back to their office, write up your awesome story and get lots of great traffic to their article. Now, whom do you think that reporter is going to turn to the next time she wants to write about cakes, bread or bakeries in the area? Now, And the next time that you have a big event happening at your bakery, whom do you think is going to be your first call? These mutually beneficial relationships are so incredibly important, especially in the local context. The more of them you have, the easier it will be for you to get your story told. But most are wonderful, creative and interesting people. Treat them with the respect that you would want to be treated with. Police do not "apprehend"; they stop or arrest or detain. George Orwell, in his essay Politics and the English Language, converts a passage from Ecclesiastes and turns it into officialese to make the point. Original: "I returned, and saw under the sun, that the race is not to the swift, not the battle to the strong, neither yet bread to the wise, nor yet riches to men of understanding, nor yet favour to men of skill; but time and chance happeneth to them all. It was in fact an adaptation of the Mirror style book he had been commissioned to write. In it he warns of the dangers of adjectives thus: "Adjectives should not be allowed in newspapers unless they have something to say. An adjective should not raise questions in the reader's mind, it should answer them. Angry informs. Tall invites the question, how tall? The well-worn phrase: his expensive tastes ran to fast cars simply whets the appetite for examples of the expensive tastes and the makes and engine capacity of the fast cars. If they add relevantly to the information being provided, they can stay. If not, strike them. Too many writers believe adjectives add colour and style. Vague or general ones add nothing. We may regard it as shorthand to speed communication because we share the understanding of what it means, but, whether intentional or not, it is a protective shield that excludes those not in the know. That is the effect it has when used in newspaper writing. Those in the know understand; the rest do not. Anything readers do not understand makes them feel left out rather than included and turns them against the story. They may well stop reading. Medical, scientific and economic terms are a case in point. Avoid them or explain them. It is the same with abbreviations and acronyms. A few could expand Nato, fewer the TUC. Many of the terms, although still in use, are generational. They need to be spelt out or explained, or another reader is lost. Just as long words speak down to those with a smaller vocabulary - and there is always a simpler, and less space consuming, alternative - so well-used Latin expressions mean nothing to those who have not learned that language, apart from lawyers who have had to mug up. Pro bono, inter alia and in extremis have no place in newspapers, and usually mean the writer is showing off. Puns and cliches Headline writers love puns and phrases from 60s pop lyrics and editors frequently have to restrain their use. They sit even less easily in copy, where only readers over 55 can identify. Again, the danger is excluding readers. Worst of all is the extended metaphor or pun. Tired old instruments struck a chord with the lottery board, which has drummed up enough cash for a complete new set, giving the band plenty to trumpet about. Apostrophes The printed word has done more to save the apostrophe than the whole of the teaching profession. Given the pace of newspaper and magazine production it is extraordinary that so few errors in spelling or punctuation appear, a tribute to the subeditors who prepare copy for publication. From advertising shockingly, sometimes intentionally to the greengrocer's board we are bombarded with mis- and missing punctuation, yet it is invariably correct in print, though seldom when it emerges from the home printer. Choose a recent, newsworthy event or topic There are a few points that we need to discuss when it comes to this step. The first of which is, of course, knowing when something is newsworthy and when something is not. A newsworthy story is anything happening in your community that might interest readers. It should be unique, active, and impactful.